Jobs guarantee with income support in response to technological unemployment?

Mar 2019
106
Victoria, Australia
Tax on sale only finishes up as hurting the customers and doesn't seem to raise enough funds to actually justify their existence as a primary revenue source.
Financial transactions fall in much the category that I don't think you would be able to raise sufficient funds for it to be viable. Besides you run of possible destroying the financial industry of your nation.

Also, you double posted. But that's kind of irrelevant.
 

Dan Howard

Ad Honorem
Aug 2014
5,006
Australia
The first step is to reverse the current trend of privatising public assets. Before this began in the 1980s, governments derived significant revenue from state-owned assets such as transportation, electricity generation, water distribution, a commonwealth bank and insurance company, telecommunications, mineral extraction, and so on. These assets need to be nationalised again with private companies paying to use the infrastructure and resources.
 
Nov 2014
421
ph
Can't the government just tax AI and robots and use the money to create make work jobs, just to make people feel useful? And purely on principle, I prefer dole disguised as work rather than simply giving out dole, hence workfare.
 

Dan Howard

Ad Honorem
Aug 2014
5,006
Australia
Can't the government just tax AI and robots and use the money to create make work jobs, just to make people feel useful? And purely on principle, I prefer dole disguised as work rather than simply giving out dole, hence workfare.
There will be no work-jobs. Imagine a multinational company where every single task is performed by AI and robots - including all of the administration. The only human will be the owner of the company.
 
Mar 2019
106
Victoria, Australia
Can't the government just tax AI and robots and use the money to create make work jobs, just to make people feel useful? And purely on principle, I prefer dole disguised as work rather than simply giving out dole, hence workfare.
Not that easy. In the literal sense yes they could. but the effects would be much too punishing for the economy and the government to realistically make that possible.

The first step is to reverse the current trend of privatising public assets. Before this began in the 1980s, governments derived significant revenue from state-owned assets such as transportation, electricity generation, water distribution, a commonwealth bank and insurance company, telecommunications, mineral extraction, and so on. These assets need to be nationalised again with private companies paying to use the infrastructure and resources.
I can certainly agree to this. But the problem is that the private companies would be thoroughly against this. And it is obvious nowadays by looking at decisions and politics that they are major-power shifters in the political world. Perhaps I would say that it would be extremely problematic for a government to actually go through with this, perhaps not impossible, but damned hard. And that doesn't even begin to consider the probalility of it actually passing and is also ignoring the political force against it.
 

Dan Howard

Ad Honorem
Aug 2014
5,006
Australia
I can certainly agree to this. But the problem is that the private companies would be thoroughly against this. And it is obvious nowadays by looking at decisions and politics that they are major-power shifters in the political world. Perhaps I would say that it would be extremely problematic for a government to actually go through with this, perhaps not impossible, but damned hard. And that doesn't even begin to consider the probalility of it actually passing and is also ignoring the political force against it.
Companies don't vote. A slick PR campaign to bring the electorate along with your vision is all you need.
 

Rodger

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
6,171
US
Will a jobs guarantee, with an income top up, basically a workfare programme, be a better idea than a pure UBI system in response to mass technological unemployment? Given that the vast majority of people actually want to work, and derive meaning from their lives by the work they do.
How is this different to what was done in the USSR? You need performance incentives to get the best out of workers. Why would you work if you got paid anyway?
I agree Dan. As for the OP, who says "the vast majority of people want to work"?
Labor Force Participation Rate - Countries - List
Note, the U.S. is at 63%, actually up significantly from the past decade, and the EU is at 58%. That's a lot of weight for those working to pull, like an albatross around one's' neck.
 
Nov 2014
421
ph
Can't the government just tax AI and robots and use the money to create make work jobs, just to make people feel useful?
There will be no work-jobs. Imagine a multinational company where every single task is performed by AI and robots - including all of the administration. The only human will be the owner of the company.
Maybe the government should pay Apple to employ workers to stamp iPhone logos on phones using a manual stamp, with the appeal of bespoke hand assembled phones? Or pay BP and Exxon to employ gas attendants again?
 
Mar 2019
106
Victoria, Australia
Companies don't vote. A slick PR campaign to bring the electorate along with your vision is all you need.
Maybe I'm just too cynical and distrusting of government. But if you think your vote still counts for anything nowadays than I, personally, think that you're either naive or overly optimistic. At least I think it is true in representative democracies wherein the voter has no actual power over any laws and instead rely on another party (ministers, elected members, etc...) to pass laws or otherwise in *supposedly* their interest. I find this very concept a complete bastardisation of the idea of democracy. It is closer to an oligarchy or a plutocracy then what I would call a democracy.

I'm not trying to offend anyone or otherwise here. but that just my opinion being stated here in this post.
 

Rodger

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
6,171
US
Maybe the government should pay Apple to employ workers to stamp iPhone logos on phones using a manual stamp, with the appeal of bespoke hand assembled phones? Or pay BP and Exxon to employ gas attendants again?
I do worry about automation and people losing jobs because of it, because I do believe that work is good for the soul. The problem is, many people today have grown accustomed to not working and certainly not working hard. So, how many people are jumping at a job to pump gas? Especially if the wage is set by the market. I was at my local supermarket yesterday. They still had the same sign up at the deli which has been there for weeks: hiring for the deli at $10/hour. The cost of living for my area is quite low. A good entry job perhaps. Are you going to pay $20 for somebody to run a slicer? Then what will be the cost of your deli meats and cheese? I am not sure how many would do it for $20/hour.