Johannes Eck on indulgences--in Latin

Oct 2012
233
A historian gives the following quote from Johannes Eck on indulgences:

"sic et episcopi et eorum vicarii, expeditissimi denariorum aucupes, partem sibi de illis vendicabant."

Can anyone translate it?

Thanks.
 
Apr 2014
259
Liverpool, England
I am struggling with this a bit.

So also the bishops and their vicars, most free AUCUPES of pence, claimed part for themselves from those.

Aucupes is not classical. Aves Aucupes means birds of prey (mediaeval). I think the sense is that the bishops and their vicars did well out of indulgences.
 

AlpinLuke

Forum Staff
Oct 2011
27,401
Italy, Lago Maggiore
In the doubt that this is about homework I'm not contributing ... anyway "aucupes" is substantially classical [why not?] and it sounds as a form of a verb which is related to the act to lie ... [on money, in this case]. If you note the end of the sentence [some of them are going to avenge], you could intuit the meaning.
 
Apr 2014
259
Liverpool, England
I was taking Aucupes as a plural noun from aucupis, which does not appear in my classical dictionaries. Yes, it could be from the classical verb aucupare, but I don't see how to fit a second person singular verb into that sentence. Is vendicare just a variant spelling of vindicare then?
 

AlpinLuke

Forum Staff
Oct 2011
27,401
Italy, Lago Maggiore
I'm familiar with classical, medieval and German Latin [I've got German roots to say all].

A part this, if you start from "aucupare" you should think to someone spying ...

This said, someone is going to avenge there ... what? Why?
 
Apr 2014
259
Liverpool, England
All right - I missed auceps- aucipis as a possible noun. Spy, bird-catcher, trapper.

The episcopi et eorum vicarii were avenging/punishing/claiming partem? If aucupes is a verb, I have to admit I don't see the object of it.

It certainly looks to me as though episcopi and vicarii are nominative, with expeditissimi aucupes in apposition.
 
Oct 2012
233
It's not about homework. I'm a historian trying to read a text by a late 19th century German historian, when they stuck Latin phrases in routinely, assuming that all their readers were fluent in Latin.
 
Apr 2014
259
Liverpool, England
Sorry, I got a bit disheartened. As is often the way with Latin there are words here that could have several meanings and aucupes could in theory be a verb, though that seems unlikely to me. It would help to have the context from the original Latin source. I gather Eck was an opponent of Luther, but it was of course possible for a good Catholic to have reservations about indulgences. For what it is worth, my considered translation is as follows.

Thus both bishops and their vicars, most free (ready) hawkers (birdcatchers) of pence, from them laid claim to (appropriated) part for themselves.

If AlpinLuke has a better idea I shall be glad to see it. Does this make sense in the context of your 19th century text?
 
Oct 2012
233
Thanks, I appreciate your effort. Yes, Eck was the Catholic Church's point man, who was assigned to debate Luther on the 95 Theses, and who himself had also been involved in selling indulgences.