Johnson & Johnson fined for opioids

Naomasa298

Forum Staff
Apr 2010
35,199
T'Republic of Yorkshire
Johnson & Johnson have been fined $520 million in the state of Oklahoma for their misleading and high pressure sales tactics that has led to the US opioid crisis.

Between 1999 and 2017, opioids have been responsible for over 400,000 deaths from overdose. Several thousand more cases are still pending.

I was given oxycodone once when I was in hospital but I refused further doses.

What's your opinion?
 

Chlodio

Forum Staff
Aug 2016
4,454
Dispargum
I don't like that these kinds of social problems can only be solved through litigation, but given the failure of governments to regulate bad industrial actors, I see no alternative.
 

Dan Howard

Ad Honorem
Aug 2014
4,745
Australia
J&J are appealing the verdict. $520 million seems to to insufficient to compensate the Oklahoma people for all the damage inflicted by their policy. The fine is about 1.5% of their annual revenue (around $70-80 billion) so it would be nice if the appeal results in a ruling saying that the original settlement was too low and hits J&J with a larger fine.
 
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Edratman

Forum Staff
Feb 2009
6,701
Eastern PA
The prescription pain pill issue enrages me beyond description.

1. I have no idea how many hundreds of thousands of people have become addicted, but recently released data said that 76 billion pills were sold between 2006 and 2012, which works out to 76 pills for every single person in the nation.
2. After becoming addicted to pain pills, countless people are turning to a cheaper alternative, heroin! How the EFF can heroin be cheaper than a pain pill?
3. I heard on the radio today that 42 people per day are dying from opiate addiction, more than auto fatalities.
4. Heroin dealers are lacing the heroin with Fentanyl of unknown strength and quality to enhance the high, a significant factor in the fatalities.
5. The DEA has been travking every single opiod pill sold in the nation since 2006 and did NOTHING!!!! NOTHING!!!! Why were they tracking that much data if they were not going to do anything????

DEA tracked every opioid pill sold in the US. The data is out—and it’s horrific
DEA tracked every opioid pill sold in the US. The data is out—and it’s horrific

Opioid shipments ballooned as an addiction crisis grew, data shows
The data, released this week by a federal court in Ohio as part of a far-reaching opioids case, shows that companies distributed 8.4 billion hydrocodone and oxycodone pills to commercial pharmacies in 2006 and 12.6 billion in 2012. That's an increase of over 50%. The data comes from the Drug Enforcement Administration, which tracks pain pills sold in the U.S.

Over that seven-year period, 76 billion pills were distributed in all, according to an analysisby The Washington Post, which had sued along with another outlet, HD Media, to obtain the data. During the same timeframe, prescription opioids contributed to more than 100,000 deaths in the U.S., according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Opioid shipments ballooned as an addiction crisis grew, data shows
 

pikeshot1600

Ad Honorem
Jul 2009
9,958
I don't like that these kinds of social problems can only be solved through litigation, but given the failure of governments to regulate bad industrial actors, I see no alternative.
There are no real governmental regulations. Governmental influence is purchased through the back door.
 
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Willempie

Ad Honorem
Jul 2015
5,375
Netherlands
J&J are appealing the verdict. $520 million seems to to insufficient to compensate the Oklahoma people for all the damage inflicted by their policy. The fine is about 1.5% of their annual revenue (around $70-80 billion) so it would be nice if the appeal results in a ruling saying that the original settlement was too low and hits J&J with a larger fine.
I agree, but I think the ruling allows for civil suits to really start. Similar to what happened with the tobacco companies.

In any case the people that will benefit are the lawyers;)
 
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aggienation

Ad Honorem
Jul 2016
9,738
USA
The pharmaceutical companies were sharks, but there is A LOT of blame to go around. Its not like doctors hadn't known for a VERY long time the negative effects of opiates and addiction.

Meanwhile, lets ignore this:

Patient Satisfaction: History, Myths, and Misperceptions

Every health care provider I've ever met, EVERY ONE, has said that patients are so heavily proscribed now out of fear of getting bad survey results that severely hit the practice's bottom line, which especially costs them funding from the govt, so they have to bend over backwards to "help" patients by giving them what they want (AKA "Doctor Shopping"). With opiates, they only stopped when the threat from over proscribing was worse than the threat of under proscribing. Who is stopping them from giving out ADHD, SSRIs, benzos, and other drugs like candy? Nothing, because that cause isn't the cause célèbre that everyone can rally around on social media.

What is the solution for the actual medical practices? A whole lot of them are just closing their doors. Its not worth owning your own practice, too much of a regulatory headache that absolutely prevents good care.
 
Nov 2016
1,006
Germany
5. The DEA has been travking every single opiod pill sold in the nation since 2006 and did NOTHING!!!! NOTHING!!!! Why were they tracking that much data if they were not going to do anything????
Ex-DEA agent: Opioid crisis fueled by drug industry and Congress

Rannazzisi ran the DEA's Office of Diversion Control, the division that regulates and investigates the pharmaceutical industry. Now in a joint investigation by 60 Minutes and The Washington Post, Rannazzisi tells the inside story of how, he says, the opioid crisis was allowed to spread -- aided by Congress, lobbyists, and a drug distribution industry that shipped, almost unchecked, hundreds of millions of pills to rogue pharmacies and pain clinics providing the rocket fuel for a crisis that, over the last two decades, has claimed 200,000 lives.

What the Washington Post/CBS DEA investigation tells you about Congress: It’s really bad - LegBranch

Lobbying Influence

The bill at the heart of the investigation is not a major bill. It is short and obscure. If you read it, you would likely have no clue what it does. And it’s a perfect example of where lobbying has the greatest influence.

Contrary to popular belief, lobbyists often do not have their biggest impact on major legislation. The intense scrutiny major legislation receives and the rich information environment in which it is debated means much more competition for lobbyists trying to affect legislation. Multiple studies illustrate that Congress is not a vending machine: money in does not necessarily equal results out. So while lobbyists have an impact on major legislation, it is not often where the lobbying industry thrives. Instead, complex, low-salience issues are where lobbyists wield the most potent influence.

H.R.471 - 114th Congress (2015-2016): Ensuring Patient Access and Effective Drug Enforcement Act of 2015
 
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Mar 2019
1,801
Kansas
I don't like that these kinds of social problems can only be solved through litigation, but given the failure of governments to regulate bad industrial actors, I see no alternative.
I really dont see this as a social problem. A lot of people became addicted to opioids through over prescription from doctors