Julius Caesar: "their men listen to the counsel of their women"

Oct 2012
203
#1
I have a recollection of Julius Caesar writing something like this in his Gallic War, referring to the "barbarians," but I cannot find it. Can anyone help me?
 
Sep 2014
931
Texas
#2
Celtic mythology is full of stories how men failed by refusing to listen to their women so this is possible, but I don't believe it was ever that important.It should also be noted the Spartans were not afraid to listen to their women or act on their advice.
It's also noteworthy that female druids were held with the same respect as the men.
This intrigues me so I will continue looking into it. Caesar also fought the Germans so it's possible there might be something in that.
 
Likes: duncanness
Mar 2019
1,653
Kansas
#3
Celtic mythology is full of stories how men failed by refusing to listen to their women so this is possible, but I don't believe it was ever that important.It should also be noted the Spartans were not afraid to listen to their women or act on their advice.
It's also noteworthy that female druids were held with the same respect as the men.
This intrigues me so I will continue looking into it. Caesar also fought the Germans so it's possible there might be something in that.
Well even to this day we have the common saying " Behind every great man is a woman"
 
Likes: bedb
Oct 2015
874
Virginia
#4
It was a Roman, Quintus Caecilius Metellus Macedonicus (cos 143) who said: "...nature has ordained that we cannot live easily with women, or without them."
 
Likes: bedb

Kirialax

Ad Honorem
Dec 2009
4,853
Blachernai
#7
I have a recollection of Julius Caesar writing something like this in his Gallic War, referring to the "barbarians," but I cannot find it. Can anyone help me?
I expect that you can't find it in Caesar because you're thinking of Tacitus, Germania, 8.Text and translation is from Page and Rouse's 1914 Loeb.

Tradition relates that some lost or losing battles have been restored by the women, by the incessance of their prayers and by the baring of their breasts; for so is it brought home to the men that the slavery, which they dread much more keenly on their women's account, is close at hand : it follows that the loyalty of those tribes is more effectually guaranteed from whom, among other hostages, maids of high birth have been exacted. Further, they conceive that in woman is a certain uncanny and prophetic sense: they neither scorn to consult them nor slight their answers. In the reign of Vespasian of happy memory we saw Velaeda treated as a deity by many during a long period; but in ancient times also they reverenced Albruna and many other women—in no spirit of flattery, nor for the manufacture of goddesses.

Memoriae proditur quasdam acies incHnatas iam et labantes a feminis restitutas constantia precum et obiectu pectorum et monstrata commiuus captivitate, quam longe impatientius feminarum suarum nomine timent, adeo ut efficacius obligentur animi eivitatum, quibus inter obsides jniellae quoque nobiles imperantur. inesse quin etiam sanctum ahquid et pro vidum putant, nee aiit consilia earum aspernantur aut responsa neglegunt. vidimus sub divo Vespasiano Velaedam diu apud plerosque nuiiiinis loco habitam ; sed et olim Albrunam et compluris alias venerati sunt, non adulatione nee tamquam facerent deas.
 
Mar 2018
756
UK
#8

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