Just Ancient Egypt

Mar 2017
870
Colorado
I'm never going to make it to Egypt. I could picture myself in the decorated tombs ... hardly breathing in amazement. But from what I understand, it's hardly an art gallery ponderous experience .... partly due to humidity & tourist vandalism ("touching" the art work, "tasting" it) they want you in&out .. "move along, move along." Mostly, it's my responsibilities that keep me home bound, but also cost ... and also concern for religious unrest ... but it sounds like it could be a huge disappointment if you want to actually LOOK at stuff, rather than just take a selfie.

I *HAVE* been to the British Museum. I was 11 and still remember the monstrous winged lion kings, stolen from Babylon. I'd go again in a heartbeat if hurdles were out of the way. I remember Cleopatra's needle on the Thames ... and some sphinxes.

The stela was a gift, but everything else was stolen ... there's no other word for it. I like Hawas claiming things he can take care of. I think everyone who can take care of them should get back their stuff ... even if *I* can't see it.

It's not the same as standing right in front of the Rosetta stone, but the plethora of museum images on the WWW around the world aren't so bad.

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I know about the findings of the Theban project: kind of crop rotation with tourists ... only assault one set of tombs at a time, giving the others a rest ... not stopping erosion, but slowing it down. From previous posts, it doesn't really sound like they're doing this. Too many tourists? Need to spread them out?

Did anyone ever propose a ventilation system? Blasting the interior with hot, dry desert air? Who cares if the tourists sweat? They really don't want them there anyway.

I've been inside pyramids in the Yucatan: no ventilation, humid jungle air ..... the walls and everyone inside were dripping. I remember touching wet walls & railings.
 

Davidius

Ad Honorem
Dec 2010
4,986
Pillium
I *HAVE* been to the British Museum. I was 11 and still remember the monstrous winged lion kings, stolen from Babylon.
The lamassus in the BM are from Nimrud, Dur-Shurukin and Balawat, not Babylon.

At least one lamassu that remained in Iraq was destroyed by ISIS, along with countless other Assyrian sculptures so kudos to the BM for preserving and protecting them.
 
Mar 2017
870
Colorado
I was going to mention that ... but my posts are usually too long winded as it is.

Morality isn't black & white: There are things wonderfully preserved, specifically because they were stolen. If they had been left alone, they might be lost forever ... as per the example of the Iraqi lamassu. On the other hand, I wouldn't want someone snatching something from my house saying "I can take better care of it than you."

There's an WWW video of some hikers, on a plateau in the middle of nowhere-American-West, that find a beautiful ceramic Native American pot in a crack in the rocks. They appreciate it for a while then put it back where they found it. They came back a yr or so later to find a landslide had demolished the area it was in.
 

John B

Ad Honorem
Mar 2016
3,853
Canada
The lamassus in the BM are from Nimrud, Dur-Shurukin and Balawat, not Babylon.

At least one lamassu that remained in Iraq was destroyed by ISIS, along with countless other Assyrian sculptures so kudos to the BM for preserving and protecting them.
This points out the problem of the ownership of mankind's heritage. We have modern nation states on the footprint of unrelated ancient cultures and in many cases unstable ones at that. Also many items were placed in western museums prior to establishment of these nation states. For protection of the items and in a historical context the argument for repatriation of most items is mute.
 

John B

Ad Honorem
Mar 2016
3,853
Canada

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