Just how much did the Hindenburg Line benefit Germany and hurt the Entente?

Kotromanic

Ad Honorem
Dec 2011
5,008
Iowa USA
That's a good point. It's quite interesting that it took four years of manpower losses for the CPs to actually go down, though. Plus, even then, Germany could have lasted a bit longer had it been able to avoid hunger and keep things steady on the home front.
Somewhere in the site archives it might be possible to find a reasonably detailed discussion whether Saxony would have been invaded from the South in early '19. I know the discussion I'm thinking of but not sure the search function can retrieve with little effort on my part.
 
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May 2017
203
Monterrey
That's a good point. It's quite interesting that it took four years of manpower losses for the CPs to actually go down, though. Plus, even then, Germany could have lasted a bit longer had it been able to avoid hunger and keep things steady on the home front.
How much did the draft hurt the farms though? Likewise, industry suffered when specialists were sent to the front.
 
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Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
22,239
SoCal
How much did the draft hurt the farms though? Likewise, industry suffered when specialists were sent to the front.
That's true for all countries, no?

Somewhere in the site archives it might be possible to find a reasonably detailed discussion whether Saxony would have been invaded from the South in early '19. I know the discussion I'm thinking of but not sure the search function can retrieve with little effort on my part.
The Allies are first going to need to successfully cross through both the Moravian mountain range(s) and the Sudeten mountain range(s):

 

pugsville

Ad Honorem
Oct 2010
9,627
That's true for all countries, no?
German agriculture was mainly small farms. The loss of manpower, horses and fertilizer did not help production. The Management of the rationing and food supply during the war also did not help. The Black market was rife,
 
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Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
22,239
SoCal
German agriculture was mainly small farms. The loss of manpower, horses and fertilizer did not help production. The Management of the rationing and food supply during the war also did not help. The Black market was rife,
Which countries didn't have their agriculture dominated by small farms back then?
 

Larrey

Ad Honorem
Sep 2011
5,807
Which countries didn't have their agriculture dominated by small farms back then?
They didn't all pre-war for political reasons decide to primarily conscript their farmers and rural population for being presumably more loyal and dependable, like Germany did.
 

pugsville

Ad Honorem
Oct 2010
9,627
They didn't all pre-war for political reasons decide to primarily conscript their farmers and rural population for being presumably more loyal and dependable, like Germany did.
The Germans did have a rural bias in their conscription.

Well the French conscripted everyone regrdless.
The Russians really had little choice but to conscript the rural population (as it was the bulk)
The British conscripted no one at the start.
 
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pugsville

Ad Honorem
Oct 2010
9,627
Did you ever hear about the Junker?
But Junkers were really just mainly east prussia,



"While Germany was characterized by large Junker estates and cartels, it was also the nation of dwarf-sized farms (60 percent of farmers owned less than five acres"
 

Larrey

Ad Honorem
Sep 2011
5,807
The Germans did have a rural bias in their conscription.

Well the French conscripted everyone regrdless.
Certainly. And so did the Germans as well eventually.

In the German case there were centrally planned measures that seem to denote a certain casual disregard for the realities of agriculture, i.e. avoidable mistakes that didn't help any, like the great German 1915 "Pig Murder":