Karl Marx's contribution to the modern anti-semitism (and racism)

pugsville

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Oct 2010
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#2
Dec 2011
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#4
Marx' influence on modern antisemitism was most likely negligible. While scholars used to assume his major "antisemitic" writings had a pronounced effect on left-wing antisemitism, this assumption has been pretty much debunked as 1) antisemitism was already rampant in the writings of Communists before, during and shortly after Marx, and 2) Marx' explicitly antisemitic texts never really gained much of a readership. However, Marx' antisemitic remarks were sometimes used by radical Leftists like the German RAF, as mentioned in the article linked to in the OP with the purpose of justifying their own antisemitism. Well, if you think about, if one categorizes the entire history of society into haves and have-nots and you take into account that Jews in most of Europe were statistically over-represented in the category of the haves, it really is no wonder that a sizable portion of Communists and Socialists would single them out as hostile elements of society at some point, and lo and behold, they did.
 
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macon

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Aug 2015
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Marx was a complete human garbage, an outcome of his "teachings" is 100 millions dead. Many would like to start a new round of massacring in his name, of course disguised under social justice and other fascist/communist crap.

All his monuments should be bulldozed asap and all his fanclub fined and jailed.
 
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Theodoric

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Mar 2012
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Marx was a complete human garbage, an outcome of his "teachings" is 100 millions dead. Many would like to start a new round of massacring in his name, of course disguised under social justice and other fascist/communist crap.

All his monuments should be bulldozed asap and all his fanclub fined and jailed.
That’s a silly thing to say.

Marx was a theorist that provided commentary on the social and economic trends of Europe at his time. He outlined a theory predicting the downfall of capitalism (investor controlled companies) due to its contradictory forces due to the synonymous nature of the working and consumer classes, and the succession of socialism (worker controlled companies) on the path to communism (post-scarcity society where money is no longer a concern or driving force for humanity).

Blaming Marx for the rise of authoritarian dictatorships like Stalin and Mao is as ludicrous as blaming Charles Darwin for extremist social Darwin policy of the Nazis. Especially considering the Maoist and Soviet style command economy nations were never a part of Marx’s theories in the first place.
 

Theodoric

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Mar 2012
2,685
#7
The traditional Christian-atisemitism was replaced by modern antisemitism in the 19th century.

An interesting article:
Karl Marx's Radical Antisemitism - The Philosophers' Magazine
As people have suggested, it’s unlikely Marx contributed much to anything at all with antisemitism given his strong Jewish following in the near future. Also, the chief forces of antisemitism in Europe associated Marxian theory with Judaism.

The primary influencers of antisemitism were the fascists. If we want to get into which philosopher contributed the most: Friedrich Nietzsche during the time when he was still in awe by Richard Wagner and was into dramatic nationalistic and anti-Jewish overstatements; and a strong influencer of nationalism and fascism.

That said, I doubt either Wagner or Nietche would have supported the extremism of the 1930s and 40s.
 

macon

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Aug 2015
3,868
Slovenia, EU
#8
That’s a silly thing to say.

Marx was a theorist that provided commentary on the social and economic trends of Europe at his time. He outlined a theory predicting the downfall of capitalism (investor controlled companies) due to its contradictory forces due to the synonymous nature of the working and consumer classes, and the succession of socialism (worker controlled companies) on the path to communism (post-scarcity society where money is no longer a concern or driving force for humanity).

Blaming Marx for the rise of authoritarian dictatorships like Stalin and Mao is as ludicrous as blaming Charles Darwin for extremist social Darwin policy of the Nazis. Especially considering the Maoist and Soviet style command economy nations were never a part of Marx’s theories in the first place.
Marx predicted and put foundations for a socialism, a slaughtersystem with 100 millions of dead. That's why I wrote what I wrote, not because of his faulty criticism of capitalism (I believe that austrian economists provided enough proofs about his mistakes even before Russian 1918 massacre) and that there was a French revolution predecessor with all practical authoritarian outcome behind a facade of good doing for a humanity. Marxism is even more despicable if considering that peasants and workers were no societal moving force as bourgeoisie was in a time of a French revolution. Then there was a wrong assumption that workers and peasants who were wronged were because of that CAPABLE to run a society. Marx's theories predicted no development of capitalism, only it's permanent exploitation which was again a complete theoretical blunder.

Your completely wrong comparison of Marx with Darwin who never connected his theories with political radicalism while Marx demanded a radical approach is laughable. Maoists and stalinists are what you get when you put wrong Marxist theories into a work. Socialism was a return to feudalism with industrial means.
 
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macon

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Aug 2015
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Slovenia, EU
#9
As people have suggested, it’s unlikely Marx contributed much to anything at all with antisemitism given his strong Jewish following in the near future. Also, the chief forces of antisemitism in Europe associated Marxian theory with Judaism.

The primary influencers of antisemitism were the fascists. If we want to get into which philosopher contributed the most: Friedrich Nietzsche during the time when he was still in awe by Richard Wagner and was into dramatic nationalistic and anti-Jewish overstatements; and a strong influencer of nationalism and fascism.

That said, I doubt either Wagner or Nietche would have supported the extremism of the 1930s and 40s.
Nietzsche was a philosopher who demanded a conscious individual not a blind crowd. He despised all crowd mentality and what nazis produced from his thought was entirely their false interpretation.

Fascists and communists are of a same stock, they have more in common than not.
 

AlpinLuke

Ad Honoris
Oct 2011
25,882
Italy, Lago Maggiore
#10
A part that Marx was descendant of Jews, so he was a Jew ... and a part that early Israel was a Socialist country influenced by Marx [think to the "Kibbuz" to have an idea] ...

I would say that Luther [the Reformer] gave a well bigger contribution to the justification of Anti-Semitism in Germany. He literally didn't stand Jews, not on an ethnic base, but on a religious base: they had to convert! The alternative is easy to be guessed.

So, no, I don't think we can connect Marx with the origins of Anti-Semitism.