Kings and Generals youtube channel

Feb 2019
1,017
Serbia
Do you guys think there would be any demand for more intense, in-depth, animated historical videos covering not only the major battles but also political / social events? In other words, a detailed podcast with some animations (maps etc)?
I'm not sure. Since these types of shorter videos gather more attention and are more entertaining I think they work well enough. Epic History's videos are extremely well animated and decently researched but they feel like a summary of an Osprey book, indeed they use Osprey as their main source and are sponsored by them. Osprey has short, concise books covering military history but these books are of varying quality and depth and as such the quality of the videos might vary if they rely only on a single publisher or source.

I think that anyone seeking more in-depth knowledge should read books, videos and documentaries are good to give summaries but are usually too limited to provide sufficient context and detail on everything.

If you want more in-depth, professional type documentaries TIK and Military History Visualised are the ones I find decent.

Some animated ones such as The Armchair Historian have a bunch of sources listed but when looking at their videos I doubt they've actually used them all in a specific video, sometimes they make errors that make it look like they didn't read some of the books they cite at all. I don't know if they're lying with their bibliography or just don't pay attention and make the slip ups on accidents or if they don't know how to properly evaluate their sources. Most others usually don't give sources and as such are suspicious to me.

I think videos and podcasts are just too short no matter how you slice it, books are still the best way to transfer such a large amount of information.
 
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Oct 2019
41
Near the dogbowl
I just discovered it. i loved it.

I did get confused about the confusing and long preludes in the War of the Roses battles, but then I realized:
1) thats where GOT came from (I'm last to know).
2) its confusing because thats what really happened. It was King of the Hill, but with swords and arrows.
 
Jul 2019
809
New Jersey
I think videos and podcasts are just too short no matter how you slice it, books are still the best way to transfer such a large amount of information.
Sometimes people can't afford the books, though. I'm thinking of something like the British History Podcast, just with accompanying visuals.
 
Nov 2014
1,672
Birmingham, UK
Do you guys think there would be any demand for more intense, in-depth, animated historical videos covering not only the major battles but also political / social events? In other words, a detailed podcast with some animations (maps etc)?
I'd say almost certainly. the demand for such things certainly isn't limited to major battles, although I imagine the battles may comprise 75%+ of the market. I believe the team that produce then have a somewhat mixed reception/popularity, but the 'Extra History/Extra Credits' videos deal with non-military themes as often as not.
 
Oct 2018
1,848
Sydney
Their videos serve as interesting and entertaining intros into different historical topics, although I'm disappointed that their 3rd Century Crisis video is only 10 minutes long.
To add another grievance to the 3rd Century Crisis video, it fails to mention the Gothic sackings of Athens and Ephesus (with the attendant destruction of one of the seven wonders of the ancient world - the Temple of Artemis), and the major Gothic victory at Abrittus (possibly the first instance in which an emperor was killed in battle - Gordian III at the Battle of Misiche is a possible earlier instance that is also overlooked by the video). Aurelian's campaigns could do with their own video. With all this said, I do enjoy their videos. I appreciate that they don't prioritize certain overdone topics like Caesar's Civil War and the Punic Wars, much as these topics are fascinating.
 
Feb 2017
328
Latin America
The best thing about the channel is the way it simplifies battles. I really have to thank the channel for understanding how battles were waged and won or lost. It's thanks to it that now I comprehend how the Goths and Romans defeated the Huns at Chalons.
 

Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
6,135
Portugal
Sometimes people can't afford the books, though. I'm thinking of something like the British History Podcast, just with accompanying visuals.
Although price may be an issue, today there are many available books, academic thesis and articles in the internet, for free, that have much more accurate and detailed information then any video on YouTube.
I admit that they can be less entertaining. The language is frequently more dull, not so determined, less speculative and conclusive.
 
Jul 2019
809
New Jersey
Although price may be an issue, today there are many available books, academic thesis and articles in the internet, for free, that have much more accurate and detailed information then any video on YouTube.
I admit that they can be less entertaining. The language is frequently more dull, not so determined, less speculative and conclusive.
I know. I'm in position to purchase my own JSTOR subscription out of pocket, and I have a healthy allowance in my budget for books (which are almost invariably of the academic sort). What I am proposing (and what I'm actually in middle of working on) is a series of academic-based lectures, except that the listener is also provided with charts, animated maps, and so on. There are also a great deal of fascinating stories which are usually not included in the academic accounts, such as the story of Marguerite de la Roque's marooning in the new world on Cartier's third voyage or the way the arch-Catholic Duc D'Aumale was unhorsed during the Battle of Dreux (1562) and trampled over by nearly the entire Huguenot cavalry, only to be completely unhurt because of the heavy plate armor he was wearing. It's these kinds of little details which can add some spice to the standard academic accounts while not diminishing their historical accuracy.
 

Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
6,135
Portugal
I know. I'm in position to purchase my own JSTOR subscription out of pocket, and I have a healthy allowance in my budget for books (which are almost invariably of the academic sort). What I am proposing (and what I'm actually in middle of working on) is a series of academic-based lectures, except that the listener is also provided with charts, animated maps, and so on. There are also a great deal of fascinating stories which are usually not included in the academic accounts, such as the story of Marguerite de la Roque's marooning in the new world on Cartier's third voyage or the way the arch-Catholic Duc D'Aumale was unhorsed during the Battle of Dreux (1562) and trampled over by nearly the entire Huguenot cavalry, only to be completely unhurt because of the heavy plate armor he was wearing. It's these kinds of little details which can add some spice to the standard academic accounts while not diminishing their historical accuracy.
Well... Some universities begin to have their classes available online:

- History of the World with Richard Bulliet. He is good but his discourse is far from fluid.

– Greek History with Donald Kagan.

(I have these two in MP3, to hear them in the car or while running)

Just saw this, still didn't heard it:

Bilkent: Medieval Europe (500-1500) | CosmoLearning History - YouTube