Koreans and Buryats have same origins theory. Can you please debunk it?

Dec 2015
58
Coruscant
#1
So, not so long ago I was lurking in Quora and found an interesting statement, that Buryats and Koreans have the same origins by some korean guy:


"The tribe that characterizes Buryat is the Kori tribe. In that case. Buryat is worthy of being a country of Kori.

Recently, however, people see the Kori tribe as a tribe of Mongol.

However, a recent Korean nationalist perspective views the Kori tribe as one of two wheels with the Mongol tribe, not a tribe of Mongol.

The Kori tribe is the original owner of Lake Baikal, an important area for the entire Siberian people. It is the people who exclusively own the sacred small area in Lake Baikal and who administer the ceremony there.

Let's go back to the explanation of the Korean researchers again.

The Kori tribe has been South Korea 's maternal ancestor (D2 mutation).

They are supposed to originate in the name of Korea. People know that Korea is the name that came from Koryo, but no one knows its origins, and it is actually from the Kori tribe.

The name Koryo was not from the Koryo Dynasty, but from Goguryeo. Goguryeo is named after Koryo, who was the first to be found. The Goguryeo people named it Koguryo in the sense of 'great Koryo'. King Jangsu, moderate king of the end of Koguryeo, changed modestly to Koryo.

In the south, there was the Gaya federation, and their original name was Karak, which seems to have the same root as Koryo. Koreans call the melody as Karak.

And Koreans use Kori in everyday words. It means a ’ring’. And It is used in enormous words in which Kori means 'bent' or ‘curved’ as a root in the words.

Pure Korean words indicating River is ‘Karam’. It is certain that Karam is a noun form of Kar- which does not know its meaning. It can be seen in the form of Kori's noun, which means 'curved'. The curved portray of a river can be seen as the etymology of all Kori something words. Korean inhabitants has common thing that they live in curved river area. 'Our hometown was the coast of a bent river' could be the secret of Kori's name.

The Kori tribe has a sophisticated legend about Arirang. The tangled contents seem to solve the secret of the famous Arirang folk song.

The tangible story is that the Kori tribe who lived near Lake Baikal increased in population. They forced the tribe to move far away to avoid marriage between relatives. Arirang is the mountain that everyone goes on the way they leave for farewell. When we crossed the mountain, we cried with sorrow for those who were leaving, those who were leaving, or parting.

They are the link between Altay, Baikal, Siberia, Manchuria and Korean peninsula.

Totem for birds, and many customs are extremely similar between Korea and the Kori tribe.

Stone stacking and praying in front of it, stone or wooden statues, hanging Cloth strings tied to a door or tree branches etc.

In the famous kingdom in Korea, Silla, the name of kings in early stage was all ‘Khan’. Indeed the founder’s name was ‘Hyeok(‘Bright’)-Geo-Se-Khan’. It’s very similar with Buryat’s famous figure of their legend ‘Geser(or Gesar) Khan’. It’s the apparent trace in Korea.

Epic of King Gesar - Wikipedia

Hyeokgeose of Silla

Buryat, Koreans think it's too much like Buyeo, the cultural starting point of Korea. If the guess is correct, Buryat is the etymology of Buyeo and the Kori tribe is the etymology of Korea.

As I explained in another article yesterday, the Buryat do not distinguish themselves from Koreans without speaking.

Dong-Yoon Lee's answer to What do Koreans think of the Mongols? Not just the people of Mongolia but other Mongolic tribes such as the Manchus, Buryats, etc.

In conclusion, the Kori tribe was a Siberian-Altay race with Mongol, which made up the two wheels of a wagon, but most of them moved to the Korean peninsula and mixed with the southern indigenous people there. However, some remained in their original hometown, and some returned to their original hometown from the northern part of the peninsula. They live with a long tradition.

The Kori population is smaller than the Mongol population, but in fact they are not small. If they are Korean relatives.

For acdemic reference.

학술교육원 "
 
Sep 2016
442
天下
#2
What's there to debunk? Some guy saw that there exists a Khori tribe among the Buryats and found vaguely similar words in Korean and created a story that is meant to explain how it is possible. There are no hard facts, just a pure conjure and it can't be really debunked, because sources about pre-Mongol ethnic history of Buryatia are very limited and devoid of details, while Korean sources are also quite late and don't offer a full picture.

The only thing that looks right is that according to the legend, the king Dongmyeong of Buyeo (not to be confused with Jumong of Goguryeo, who was also known as king Dongmyeong) came from a place in the north known as Gori (槀離). However, this legend predates the knowledge of Khori tribe of Buryats by around 1500 years. It's quite a stretch to connect those two.

With early Silla kings using the Khan title, this is controversial, but there are 1 or 2 sources which mention Xiongnu as ancestors of Silla royals. However, this remains controversial and unaccepted by most scholars. The titles held by Silla royals were Geosogan (居西干), Isageum (尼師今), Maripgan (麻立干). Some people see this -gan suffix as the same as Khan. However, most of scholars think this is a too far fetched conclusion.
 
Dec 2015
58
Coruscant
#3
What's there to debunk? Some guy saw that there exists a Khori tribe among the Buryats and found vaguely similar words in Korean and created a story that is meant to explain how it is possible. There are no hard facts, just a pure conjure and it can't be really debunked, because sources about pre-Mongol ethnic history of Buryatia are very limited and devoid of details, while Korean sources are also quite late and don't offer a full picture.

The only thing that looks right is that according to the legend, the king Dongmyeong of Buyeo (not to be confused with Jumong of Goguryeo, who was also known as king Dongmyeong) came from a place in the north known as Gori (槀離). However, this legend predates the knowledge of Khori tribe of Buryats by around 1500 years. It's quite a stretch to connect those two.

With early Silla kings using the Khan title, this is controversial, but there are 1 or 2 sources which mention Xiongnu as ancestors of Silla royals. However, this remains controversial and unaccepted by most scholars. The titles held by Silla royals were Geosogan (居西干), Isageum (尼師今), Maripgan (麻立干). Some people see this -gan suffix as the same as Khan. However, most of scholars think this is a too far fetched conclusion.
Seems enuogh to me. It's just that recently I found out a new(2017) genetic research about Buryats, where they claim that acording to mtDNA Buryats are closer to eastern Chinese and Japanese rather than to Yakuts(Sakha) and other ethnicities. And it was pretty strange to me, seems Khori tribe and Yakuts supposed to have same ancestors.
 
#4
Kori could also be related to Kuri, which means copper in korean. I heard of a theory that the significance of word Kori in korean history comes from the extensive usage of bronze of ancient peoples in manchuria, which is basically copper.
 
Dec 2015
58
Coruscant
#5
Kori could also be related to Kuri, which means copper in korean. I heard of a theory that the significance of word Kori in korean history comes from the extensive usage of bronze of ancient peoples in manchuria, which is basically copper.
Well, in buryat language word Khori translates as 20. But since there are only 11 clans in Khori tribe, so I thought maybe it can be explained from other language perspective. Maybe old Turkic or old Mongolian or any other. Cuz as it is, it doesn't make much sense.
 
Apr 2017
285
Northern lands
#6
Every East Asian group started from ancient Korea. That is, before ancient Korea was gradually moved into what we know as the Korean peninsula today, from its original location in roughly today's northern Hebei.

Siberian-Altay race
There's really no such thing. Basically, the earliest humans to reach a civilizational state had colonized the cold and empty northern interiors of Eurasia. They did this by seafaring along the coasts and finding locations that were too cold for the previous natives in the nearby viscinity, setting up colonies there, and using their ingenuity and technical skills to insulate themselves from the cold. Hence why your "Siberian-Altay race" lacks natural cold evolution features and are generally hairless. One of these colony locations is ancient Korea in northern Hebei.

I personally prefer the name 'Highland East African' race, or Atlantean race.
 
Last edited:

Naomasa298

Forum Staff
Apr 2010
31,000
T'Republic of Yorkshire
#7
Every East Asian group started from ancient Korea. That is, before ancient Korea was gradually moved into what we know as the Korean peninsula today, from its original location in roughly today's northern Hebei.


There's really no such thing. Basically, the earliest humans to reach a civilizational state had colonized the cold and empty northern interiors of Eurasia. They did this by seafaring along the coasts and finding locations that were too cold for the previous natives in the nearby viscinity, setting up colonies there, and using their ingenuity and technical skills to insulate themselves from the cold. Hence why your "Siberian-Altay race" lacks natural cold evolution features and are generally hairless. One of these colony locations is ancient Korea in northern Hebei.

I personally prefer the name 'Highland East African' race, or Atlantean race.
Final warning. If ypu post this nonsense anuwhere on Historum othet than Speculative History, you will be permanently banned.
 
Jun 2014
1,018
Earth
#8
It seems most new Korean theories on history anchor on some words sounding similar.

To me the burden of proof lies on the assertion, and comparing words that happen to sound vaguely similar is not worthy of true historical discussion.
 
Dec 2015
58
Coruscant
#9
It seems most new Korean theories on history anchor on some words sounding similar.

To me the burden of proof lies on the assertion, and comparing words that happen to sound vaguely similar is not worthy of true historical discussion.
Nah, the only reason I was interested cuz recently I found some reasearch which I understood wrongly, that Japanese and eastern Chinese are more close to Buryats than other ethnicities. But actually it was about same level of some kind of deversity. And there was some reasearch in 2005 done by local geneticist who claimed that Koreans are closest realatives to us. Nobody believed it, neither did I. It just that recent research made me reconsider my opinion and it could open interesting views upon Buryat history, which at the moment hardly researched. But as my understanding of that reasearch was wrong, thus it all got back to as it was before.

I reffer to this research: Mitogenomic diversity and differentiation of the Buryats
 

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