Large populations that used to live somewhere but no longer do?

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
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Also, I suppose that a lot of Palestinian villages in what is now Israel can count for this since they don't appear to have much Arabs living there right now:



Similarly, in Kuwait, there were much more Palestinian Arabs before 1991 than there are today. Kuwait expelled them due to the PLO's support of Saddam Hussein's Kuwait invasion in 1990.
 
Dec 2017
308
Regnum Teutonicum
The Yazidis are a good example. They are a religious minority which is part of the Kurdish people. They have a long history of being discriminated and worse, so they live a little bit secretive. At the beginning of t 20th century, the Yazidis mostly lived in the kurdish regions of Turkey, Syria and Iraq, as well as the multireligious plains of Ninive and some other parts of Iraq. During the Armenian Genocide, many Yazidis did hide Armenians. So later Armenia allowed Yazidis to immigrate to Armenia. This is the reason why a few thousand Yazidis then lived in Armenia and neighbouring Georgia. Except for Iraqui Kurdistan, only very few Yazidis are still left there.
When Germany in the 1960's recruited guest workers in Turkey, a lot of them happened to come from the kurdish region, where the Yazidis lived, because this was one of the poorest parts of Turkey. This is how the first Yazidis ended up in Germany. The second wave of Yazidis came to Germany from Syria between 1980 and 1990, e.g. in 1962 120,000 Kurds (not all of them Yazidis) had been made stateless by the Syrian government and were discriminated against. When there was serious discrimination against the Yazidis of Turkey in the 1990's and they feared religious persecution and nearly all of them moved to Germany, because they knew there were Yazidis already living there. Additional Yazidias fled to Europe from the Baath Regime in the late 80's/early 90's. During the Iraq war a lot of Yazidis fled to Germany. After the Americans left Iraq and Chaos broke out, most Yazidis living elsewhere in Iraq fled to Iraqi Kurdistan, the plain of Ninive and Germany. With the dissolution of the Soviet Union, the people imigrating to Germany included Yazidis from the Caucasus. Then the "IS" came along and started genoiciding and enslaving Yazidis first in Syria (which send a big wave of Yazidis to Germany) and then they invaded and destroyed the multireligious plains of Ninive, which again sent masses of Yazidis to Germany and Iraqi Kurdistan. Next the "IS" targeted Iraqi Kurdistan, but they luckily could withstand and the IS could be even stopped at the gates of Lalish (the Mekka/Jerusalem of the Yazidis). Even the religious leader of the Yazidis Mir Tahsin Saied Beg (in office since 1944!) fled to Germany around 2009, where he died in January this year.
There exist less then 1 million Yezidis in the world, of which 85 % have been displaced. There are only twp places with large enough communities for long-term survival: Germany with 200,000 and Iraqi Kurdistan with 500,000 Yazidis. In the rest of their native range there are only a few left: in Turkey around 5,000 and in Syria around 10,000.
 
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Maki

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
3,565
Republika Srpska
Yeah, I forgot to mention both Greeks and Armenians in eastern Anatolia here. There were sizable communities of them there before WWI but the ethnic cleansing and genocide of WWI and the aftermath of WWI caused these communities to almost completely disappear from eastern Anatolia. :(
This went the other way on a much smaller scale. For example during the Russian Empire population of Yerevan was around 50% Tatar/Azerbaijani and now it is almost entirely Armenian.
 
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Futurist

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May 2014
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This went the other way on a much smaller scale. For example during the Russian Empire population of Yerevan was around 50% Tatar/Azerbaijani and now it is almost entirely Armenian.
I know that a lot of Armenians moved to Soviet Armenia in the 1910s and/or 1920s, but I wonder why the Azeris left Yerevan en masse. Or were there simply not that many of them there in the first place if Yerevan was previously a much smaller city? I mean, Kiev was majority-Russian in 1897 (at least if my memories are correct), but its total population was also much smaller back then--so in terms of total numbers, there weren't that many Russians in Kiev back in 1897.
 

Maki

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
3,565
Republika Srpska
I know that a lot of Armenians moved to Soviet Armenia in the 1910s and/or 1920s, but I wonder why the Azeris left Yerevan en masse. Or were there simply not that many of them there in the first place if Yerevan was previously a much smaller city? I mean, Kiev was majority-Russian in 1897 (at least if my memories are correct), but its total population was also much smaller back then--so in terms of total numbers, there weren't that many Russians in Kiev back in 1897.
Yerevan was much, much smaller back then but the number of Azeris also declined. There is also this map:
 

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Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
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Yerevan was much, much smaller back then but the number of Azeris also declined. There is also this map:
Too bad that this map doesn't have a color scale. :( Are those areas that have 50% Muslims, or what?