Let's post examples of Chinese architecture that SURVIVES from the ancient world

cachibatches

Ad Honorem
Mar 2012
2,354
I just found this one, and would like to see what we can add. Stone City, first built by the Wu Kingdom ruler Sun Quan.




In various threads we have posted stone tombs, mudbrick pyramids, segments of the original great wall. Let's post them all in one thread. Perhaps someone can post some pics of what is left of the steelmaking plants that often come up.

The only thing I am asking is that I would like to post EXTANT architecture and engineering that can actually be visited today. That is what I am curious about, so please, nothing that has been re-built.

I don't want to crowd my own thread, so will add one more: Jade Gate Pass.

 
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Ighayere

Ad Honorem
Jul 2012
2,640
Benin City, Nigeria
Maybe reconsider the tone of the opening post?
It's probably just me, but it sounds a bit off.
 

Ighayere

Ad Honorem
Jul 2012
2,640
Benin City, Nigeria


Lei Cheng Uk Han Tomb, from the Eastern Han Dynasty (25 A.D. - 220 A.D.)
 

HackneyedScribe

Ad Honorem
Feb 2011
6,545


Western Han Iron Bridge Prier, 1.32 tons



Seven Han dynasty Iron planks found at the bridge remains in Sha He. Each plank is 700×110×7 cm.



Front chamber of tomb M26 in Henan.
 
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HackneyedScribe

Ad Honorem
Feb 2011
6,545
I'm not sure what you mean. The Han didn't need buildings for making steel. Their blast furnaces mad pig iron. This iron isn't useful so it is further treated into steel or wrought iron or cast iron but this latter process at most uses a cupola furnace which is probably too small to consider as a building. I suppose you can say that the blast furnace is big enough to be akin to a one-room building.



Number 1 and Number 2 furnaces found next to each other:





Iron remains:



Pond:


Tap:


Where four wooden posts would have been, but time chewed them away:


Well:
 
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cachibatches

Ad Honorem
Mar 2012
2,354
I'm not sure what you mean. The Han didn't need buildings for making steel. Their blast furnaces mad pig iron. This iron isn't useful so it is further treated into steel or wrought iron or cast iron but this latter process at most uses a cupola furnace which is probably too small to consider as a building. I suppose you can say that the blast furnace is big enough to be akin to a one-room building.



Number 1 and Number 2 furnaces found next to each other:





Iron remains:



Pond:


Tap:


Where four wooden posts would have been, but time chewed them away:


Well:

Excellent. I would say that counts. Good stuff.
 

cachibatches

Ad Honorem
Mar 2012
2,354
Was hoping that there would be more takers, but it no one else wants to jump in, how about this Han dynasty watchtower at Dunhuang.






And the Hecang fortress, from about 104 BC.

 
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