LGBT lessons in schools

Naomasa298

Forum Staff
Apr 2010
35,459
T'Republic of Yorkshire
Now, this is potentially a charged topic so let's try and discuss it like adults.

There has been a case in the UK recently where a head teacher introduced LGBT classes in a primary school, which was opposed by many parents, a lot of whom are Muslim. In addition to these issues, the lessons also teach children about diversity, amongst other things. Here is a link to one of the stories about it on the BBC:
School's LGBT lessons 'are appropriate'

I am against this. Not because I have anything against LGBT rights, but I do not feel that this IS an age-appropriate topic. Primary school is far too early to be burdening children with this sort of information. It is an age where children are possibly confused about their sexuality, and whether this is intentional or not, these sorts of lessons only serve to confuse them more.

For the same reason, I oppose sex education at this age, and teaching about consent. In the age of #MeToo, I can't help feel that our society has gone too far. Children should be allowed to be children. At this age, they should be worrying about Pokemon, Power Rangers and Barbie, not being pressured to act like miniature adults.

I also can't help feeling, after having watched an interview with the head teacher in question, that this is a woman out to make a name for herself, rather than having the interests of the children at heart.

What do you all think?
 
Jun 2018
542
New Hampshire
Now, this is potentially a charged topic so let's try and discuss it like adults.

There has been a case in the UK recently where a head teacher introduced LGBT classes in a primary school, which was opposed by many parents, a lot of whom are Muslim. In addition to these issues, the lessons also teach children about diversity, amongst other things. Here is a link to one of the stories about it on the BBC:
School's LGBT lessons 'are appropriate'

I am against this. Not because I have anything against LGBT rights, but I do not feel that this IS an age-appropriate topic. Primary school is far too early to be burdening children with this sort of information. It is an age where children are possibly confused about their sexuality, and whether this is intentional or not, these sorts of lessons only serve to confuse them more.

For the same reason, I oppose sex education at this age, and teaching about consent. In the age of #MeToo, I can't help feel that our society has gone too far. Children should be allowed to be children. At this age, they should be worrying about Pokemon, Power Rangers and Barbie, not being pressured to act like miniature adults.

I also can't help feeling, after having watched an interview with the head teacher in question, that this is a woman out to make a name for herself, rather than having the interests of the children at heart.

What do you all think?
I agree. Morality and sex education should be the responsibility of the parents. Schools need to stick with their primary purpose, which is educating children and enabling them to become successful, intelligent, and hard working adults. The rest should be the responsibility of the parents and the churches.
 

Cepheus

Ad Honorem
Dec 2011
2,344
Generally, I follow the rule that local schools should follow local sensibilities.

If the community involved does not want it, for whatever reason, then I think it is reasonable to take it out of the curriculum on those grounds..

There is no solution here that will please everyone.

In regard to your specific concern, IOW, children are too young for this, I would whole heartedly agree.

Sure, some children are exposed to the issue before they are ready. That is what parents are for.
 

Naomasa298

Forum Staff
Apr 2010
35,459
T'Republic of Yorkshire
I agree. Morality and sex education should be the responsibility of the parents. Schools need to stick with their primary purpose, which is educating children and enabling them to become successful, intelligent, and hard working adults. The rest should be the responsibility of the parents and the churches.
Oh, I'm not saying schools shouldn't teach it, I'm simply saying that they shouldn't teach it at this age.

I personally would be wary of leaving morality lessons to churches, but that's a discussion for another day.
 
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MG1962a

Ad Honorem
Mar 2019
2,164
Kansas
What do you all think?
Well the article is not clear in what year this education begins. I am very comfortable with it appearing in year 6 as an intro and then expanded on going forward into high school. But if they are looking to be doing it in years 1 or 2 for example. Then we are going to have a problem.
 
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Reactions: Ichon
Jun 2016
1,863
England, 200 yards from Wales
Now, this is potentially a charged topic so let's try and discuss it like adults.

There has been a case in the UK recently where a head teacher introduced LGBT classes in a primary school, which was opposed by many parents, a lot of whom are Muslim. In addition to these issues, the lessons also teach children about diversity, amongst other things. Here is a link to one of the stories about it on the BBC:
School's LGBT lessons 'are appropriate'

I am against this. Not because I have anything against LGBT rights, but I do not feel that this IS an age-appropriate topic. Primary school is far too early to be burdening children with this sort of information. It is an age where children are possibly confused about their sexuality, and whether this is intentional or not, these sorts of lessons only serve to confuse them more.

For the same reason, I oppose sex education at this age, and teaching about consent. In the age of #MeToo, I can't help feel that our society has gone too far. Children should be allowed to be children. At this age, they should be worrying about Pokemon, Power Rangers and Barbie, not being pressured to act like miniature adults.

I also can't help feeling, after having watched an interview with the head teacher in question, that this is a woman out to make a name for herself, rather than having the interests of the children at heart.

What do you all think?
I see your point, but I wonder how it was taught? Must it necessarily be taught as a sexual matter, or could it have been basically just explaining that couples, parents even, aren't always male and female, and some other things that are simply facts of the modern world?
 
Feb 2019
896
Pennsylvania, US
At that age (in primary school, starting age 5/6, right?), there is quite a lot you can teach them about diversity, acceptance, etc., without essentially hypersexualizing the world (because when you're too young to have sexual impulses, it is a very abstract concept and easily misunderstood and ingrained in ways that do no good for that individual). Kids should be socially accepting and appreciative of someone with a different orientation, first for the person that they are, the talents and traits they possess... not simply because they are gay/lesbian/trans.

I think teaching kids to not be held to the strict gender stereotypes (girls play with dolls, boys with cars) probably does more at that age than trying to explain what makes a homosexual and homosexual. Also... it cracks me up when people try to force their kids out of the gender stereotypes... people are all different, the point is accepting the difference and having a choose beyond the gender construct... not forcing them out of their comfort zone.

Also, sidetrack: I'm not a huge fan of the MeToo movement... simply because I've seen people use it to vilify rather innocent things (yeah, sad... unattractive guy made a pass at you... or once a guy made a salacious remark...) which is a bit like a slap in the face to women who endured true traumas (rape, childhood sexual abuse, domestic abuse)... it's not so easy to tag yourself with a MeToo when you are barely able to voice what happened. So, I'm not sure how effective it's been at giving a voice to women who have suffered... and I'm not sure how much it makes them feel like they have common ground with others when the range of experiences encompasses people who have been hit on by a co-worker AND people who suffer PTSD from years of violent sexual abuse as a child. There's a rather broad area of separation there. Not saying you have to accept someone's advances if you don't feel comfortable... but trying to have it all in perspective. You can't paint an entire gender and their expressions as “toxic”...

But enough about that... yeah, let kids be kids for a while. Don't try to force them into a box of the sexualized victim or transgender or whatever... this teacher probably is trying to make a name for herself and kinda using other people's kids to do so.