Life in the suburbs

Bart Dale

Ad Honorem
Dec 2009
7,095
For people with families, suburban living is.often better. Bigger yards for the kids to play in, and it is easier to bring home the family's weekly groceries in a car and carry it to the house than lugging it on a bus or train. When driving, you can leave when you want to, not work around the train or bus schedules. If you miss your bus, you.might wait 15 min, half hour for the next. Suburban living is often just more convenient. As.a single person, or without children, city life is more interesting, exciting. But once you have families, the greater room you have in the suburbs becomes more important.

You lose out on the museums, theaters, in the suburbs, but if you have young kids they probably wouldn't appreciate many of the museums or theaters the city offers. I loved living in a city, but as I get older, the convenience of suburb becomes more attractive. I used to think a suburb was the worst of both worlds, lacking the countryside of living in the country, but lacking the museums, theaters, clubs, that made the city such an interesting place to live. But now I kind of changed my mind.
 
Jan 2019
130
USA
You blame suburbans for supporting the social dysfunction in this country? I don't understand. Why? The first paragraph is loaded with "i". You're sharing your own opinion. Suburbans have less crime and overwhelmingly better school systems. I don't think its political. It's a matter of personal preference. The vast majority of the population in a state is centered around and inside the cities limits.

Not to mention, most cities come with an outrageous cost of living. Even in Baltimore, places like Federal Hill, Canton, Fells Point, are OUTRAGEOUS to live in. They are also riddled with crime, congestion, and poor school systems. You can drive 30-45 minutes in any direction and find a nicer home, better school systems, less crime, for less money.
 
Aug 2018
584
Southern Indiana
I don't think anything short of a crippling epidemic can stop it. The worst part is that rural areas are now targeted by the rich-ish and their Mc Mansions.
 

aggienation

Ad Honorem
Jul 2016
9,813
USA
I don't think anything short of a crippling epidemic can stop it. The worst part is that rural areas are now targeted by the rich-ish and their Mc Mansions.
Oh noes! Rural farmers selling off their land to the highest bidder who plan to build new houses on their own property. What an atrocity! Surely, the only way to correct this evil course is for some new strain of super flu to kill off tens of millions of people in the USA!
 

Iraq Bruin

Ad Honorem
Oct 2010
5,197
DC
Suburbia didn't destroy Detroit, Detroit destroyed Detroit.

The car industry went under, putting factories out of business. Destructive race riots in the late 60s gave many the idea to get the hell out, the famous White Flight. Horrific, criminal, incompetent city leadership where one party controlled the city since 1962. Sound nice? Suburbs didn't cause that. But suburbs provided an option, a better one, than living in a crappy city going downhill further every year.

And you're talking about Detroit, the historic home of American automobile manufacturing, and private car ownership as if its a chore and not a privilege to own one. Yes, there is traffic, but even worse inside Detroit itself.
The older I got the further away from DC I am, multiple reasons involved:

1-Space for the money is outrageous, you get nothing valuable in return. One does not need to live near DC to get the museums, night life, or "good food".
2-I have a child, I worry about his future, I do not need a DC-like government to decide his public education (even by their crazy non-education-oriented regulations)
3-Big cities tend to have crimes (serious and petty) with the government turning a blind eye to them, less investigations happen even though higher taxes are advocated to "solve" that "issue", but beware of what the "solution" might be.
4-Big cities in general do not have "green space" outside of "parks"
5-With good income people living in the suburbs, big cities do eventually learn who is "fudning" their fun projects and businesss know where to open theirs to find the good income customers without these "fun project" funding schemes.
6-I love DC but even I know it would be a failing city if it were not for the federal government, foreign missions, the people that are employed by them, the people that are employed by those who deal with them as well as the establishments that serve them.

Even if 2-6 were not true, 1 is more than enough to leave it.
 
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aggienation

Ad Honorem
Jul 2016
9,813
USA
Cities made sense when they were governed well, but most importantly, that was where the jobs were. Not just white color, but manufacturing too. As soon as the manufacturing jobs dried up, they lost the vast majority of their tax base. Those that stayed did so largely because they were either too conditioned to leave, or didn't think they had the option to. Those that could leave, did. Suburbia provides housing options greater than rural living. Tract housing, infrastructure, good schools, parks, lots of stores in the form of actual malls and strip malls, restaurants, etc. Sure, not much in the way of museums or theater. Boo hoo, how often is someone going to those anyway? Not enough that a couple hours on a car, bus, or train is that much a hassle.

What do cities provide in the 21st century? Generally horrible public schools, besides in the wealthiest neighborhoods who work very hard to not integrate them. Very high crime, most especially violent crime, plus the occasional city wide riot. Horrific traffic to the point owning a car is foolish and even public transportation is a nightmare. High taxes. Higher cost of living in terms of rent or home owning. Terrible pollution and filth. Homeless crapping on the streets or shooting up heroin right in front of you.

But this is evil?

 
Oct 2018
1,209
Adelaide south Australia
@stevev

Thanks for that, fascinating.

About 30 years ago, I learned that demographically, Swedish cities are similar to the city of Adelaide.

From the 1970's, Sweden has had very different ideas of town planning. They have a 3 way system; relatively high density flats along major transport corridors for singles/young working couples. Medium density for families. Eg a dozen or so single story homes, with virtually no land attached, built around a common park/ reserve of say an acre. Medium density smaller units for retirees.That's the broad idea as I remember it.

Today in Adelaide median new house price is $620,000 .The block of land takes a large chunk of that. Partly in response to that, Adelaide is becoming more medium density by default. Older house on 700-1000sq metres is sold and demolished.Up to three new houses are built on that block .Very few new houses are being built on the traditional 1/4 acre block.

The other reason is people are fed up having to commute an hour or more to work. This often by car, as Adelaide is not well served by public transport.

Cheaper housing is still available further out , North or South. I live North of the CBD. ---The 5 room house next to mine, same age and general condition, sold to its present owners about a year ago, for $380K. My house is worth about the same, perhaps a little more due to extensive renovations over the last couple of years. ( I paid $100K in 1991)
 

stevev

Ad Honorem
Apr 2017
3,624
Las Vegas, NV USA
@stevev

Today in Adelaide median new house price is $620,000 .The block of land takes a large chunk of that. ame, perhaps a little more due to extensive renovations over the last couple of years. ( I paid $100K in 1991)
620 K median? I think the Australian dollar trades close to the US dollar. Is that the city center? Obviously that's a reason to move to the suburbs. Generally young unmarried urban dwellers rent and share.

My point is not that that US cities are great places to live. Some are better than others. My point is that the move to the suburbs preceded the decay of many cities like Detroit. The worse things got in the cities, the more the people fled. Detroit in 1950 was actually a city of well built single family homes. The flight coincided with the building of freeways and accelerated.
 
Oct 2018
1,209
Adelaide south Australia
620 K median? I think the Australian dollar trades close to the US dollar. Is that the city center? Obviously that's a reason to move to the suburbs. Generally young unmarried urban dwellers rent and share.

My point is not that that US cities are great places to live. Some are better than others. My point is that the move to the suburbs preceded the decay of many cities like Detroit. The worse things got in the cities, the more the people fled. Detroit in 1950 was actually a city of well built single family homes. The flight coincided with the building of freeways and accelerated.
No, that is not the CBD ,but reasonably close. The city square mile has only about 14,000 residents.

We have had slum-ish suburbs. Close to the city, many have been gentrified in the couple of decades

I grew up in one of our post WW2 suburbs; largely:"War Service" homes.Veterans were entitled to a mortgage loan, @ 3.75, over 40 years.' about a 20 minute bus ride to the city.

In various lists, of which cities are the most liveable, Australia often has 3 cities in the top 10, with Melbourne at number 1. I've lived in Melbourne, and think Adelaide is superior, unless a varied hight life. Great place for families with kids,.

An English friend asserted that Adelaide is a cultural desert, and moved back to England so her kids could go to Cambridge.

I was born here ,and have lived her most of my life. I have also live in a foreign country and am an experienced world traveler.I'll stay here

Below Youtube clip of my beautiful city.

What I was saying is how is the holocaust more disturbing than lets say the number of people who died from Communism?