List of Jacobite prisoners after Culloden

Jul 2019
848
New Jersey
A safe guess to make because Clan Donald is the largest Scottish clan.
Not really. Ever since the revocation of the Lordship of the Isles in 1493, Clan Donald became a fragmented shadow of its former self. Clan Campbell (Argyll) was by far the largest and most powerful of the Highlander Clans, and they usually assimilated and acculturated themselves to the Lowland elites. And even if you want to tell me that the Campbells weren't "real" Highlanders, Clan Gordon (Huntly) was also more powerful than the MacDonalds. The MacDonalds were weakened and fragmented, and yet they, practically always, sided against the crown. The MacDonalds weren't necessarily the biggest; they were just the most incorrigible.
 
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Jun 2017
630
maine
I'm talking about size, not power. You need to include all the septs (and there are over 100), all of whom are considered to be members of Clan Donald. I don't dispute that the Campbells were Highlanders. Historically Clan Campbell and Clan Gordon were often (but certainly not always) pro-English; Clan Donald was out for itself.
 
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Jul 2019
848
New Jersey
I'm talking about size, not power. You need to include all the septs (and there are over 100), all of whom are considered to be members of Clan Donald. I don't dispute that the Campbells were Highlanders. Historically Clan Campbell and Clan Gordon were often (but certainly not always) pro-English; Clan Donald was out for itself.
Okay, then we're in agreement. While Clan Donald may have been large, that wasn't the operative factor. I thought you were saying that the only reason why Clan Donald is so represented among the Highlander rebellions was only because they were so large (ie you would have found plenty of MacDonalds on both sides).
 
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GogLais

Ad Honorem
Sep 2013
5,506
Wirral
I am not the biggest fan of BPC, even as someone who tends to side with the Highlanders cause a little more than their lowland bretheren. BPC acted like a snake in a lot of ways, imo.
Oh I agree I’m not a great admirer of him. I came across a plaque at the house where he lived in Rome and I found out afterwards that he’s buried in St Peter’s, seeing his grave is one of several things I’d like to go back there to do sometime.
 
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Jun 2017
630
maine
Okay, then we're in agreement. While Clan Donald may have been large, that wasn't the operative factor. I thought you were saying that the only reason why Clan Donald is so represented among the Highlander rebellions was only because they were so large (ie you would have found plenty of MacDonalds on both sides).
What I meant was that it was safe to guess that one would find members of Clan Donald on any side because it was so large.
 
Jul 2019
848
New Jersey
What I meant was that it was safe to guess that one would find members of Clan Donald on any side because it was so large.
Some, yes. There were always individuals who went rogue. But I can't think of any major conflict from the 16th through the 18th century in which a substantial number of MacDonalds allied with the Presbyterians against the Episcopal/Catholic end of the spectrum. Correct me if I'm wrong, but the MacDonalds always leaned heavily toward the side that opposed the Presbyterians.
 
Jun 2017
630
maine
Some, yes. There were always individuals who went rogue. But I can't think of any major conflict from the 16th through the 18th century in which a substantial number of MacDonalds allied with the Presbyterians against the Episcopal/Catholic end of the spectrum. Correct me if I'm wrong, but the MacDonalds always leaned heavily toward the side that opposed the Presbyterians.
I agree with that--a large percentage of Clan Donald usually did. But there were exceptions--and not always rogue of "broken" men. There were several Clan Donald septs among those who went to Northern Ireland and became part of the Protestant force there. The Mac/McCutcheons (or Cutchins) are one example.
 
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Jun 2017
630
maine
I am not the biggest fan of BPC, even as someone who tends to side with the Highlanders cause a little more than their lowland bretheren. BPC acted like a snake in a lot of ways, imo.
I hope that you consider all this the next time you encounter an odious old man--perhaps he too was once a hopeful, enthusiastic youth! :)
 
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Nov 2019
2
Portland, OR
Some, yes. There were always individuals who went rogue. But I can't think of any major conflict from the 16th through the 18th century in which a substantial number of MacDonalds allied with the Presbyterians against the Episcopal/Catholic end of the spectrum. Correct me if I'm wrong, but the MacDonalds always leaned heavily toward the side that opposed the Presbyterians.
There are quite a lot of Macdonald/Macdonell branches to consider when discussing faith and loyalties. Like the nature of kinship relations both within and outwith the Highlands, their political and ideological loyalties shifted and diverged through the early modern era. Macdonalds of Sleat, Largie, and Sanda were divided intra-clan between non-juring Episcopalians and Presbyterians, and there was indeed a Catholic presence in the Isles – especially in Sleat. Faith was rarely, if ever, a primary determinant for the direction of a particular clan, and plenty of chiefs bore confessional beliefs that differed from that of their tenants. In the case of significant families of Macdonalds from the Isles, their political loyalties spanned the gamut of possibilities: they were neutral during the Wars of the Three Kingdoms, then decidedly Jacobite from the Revolution to beyond the Fifteen. Despite a 'tradition' of Stuart loyalty, they markedly stayed out of the Forty-five, and some even explicitly gave oaths to maintain the Hanoverian succession.

I've attached a table that shows the confessional and political lineages of the primary Macdonald clans through the early modern era. This have been compiled from Allan Macinnes' seminal Clanship, Commerce and the House of Stuart, 1603-1788, and plenty more about the attitudes and culture of the Gàidhealtachd that are relevant to this topic can be found within. The full table of the fifty primary clans can be seen and searched/filtered here.

Best wishes,
Darren

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