Little man with huge potential

Feb 2013
724
#1
Very interesting find recently.



Little man with huge potential


An ancient Indian figure of a human with a boar-like head could provide a crucial clue in the story of the development of writing. The copper figure, discovered in the foundations of a villager’s house, is thousands of years old. It went on display for the first time last month, in a major exhibition on Indian art in Brussels.
The 30cm-high figure, which weighs 2kg, was found by Sabdar Ali, who lives in Kheri Gujar, in the state of Haryana in the Punjab. It has been officially declared an antiquity and now belongs to the Archaeological Survey of India. Ali says he found the figure in the foundations of his home.

The figure has a cast relief on its chest of a unicorn-like animal, similar to motifs found on seals of the Harappa culture, which thrived until around 1900BC. Most exciting, however, is the inscription above this creature, in less bold relief. Naman Ahuja, the curator of the exhibition “The Body in Indian Art” at the Bozar Centre for Fine Arts in Brussels (until 5 January 2014), describes the find as the “most amazing” recent discovery from this early period. He claims that the inscription represents “a combination of Harappan signs and Brahmi letters”, suggesting that it comes from “a period of overlap between the two cultures”.

Early writing

The Harappa civilisation, in the Indus Valley, developed writing around 2500BC; the result was one of the earliest scripts. Its culture declined around 1900 BC. The earliest surviving example of Brahmi writing, used in the Ganges Valley, dates from the third century BC.

What has puzzled scholars is the lack of evidence of writing in the Indian subcontinent during the 1,500 years between the end of Harappa script and the emergence of Brahmi script. This has led to a debate over whether Brahmi writing developed indigenously in India or came about through contacts further to the west.

The artefact suggests a possible link. Harappa script has not yet been deciphered, so this three-line text could end up playing a key role. The inscription has been transcribed on the basis of Brahmi to read: “King/Ki Ma Jhi [name of king]/Sha Da Ya [form of god]”.

The figure appears to be a cult object. With its head turned towards the side and raised arms, Ahuja says the figure “looks unmistakably like the Hindu god Varaha”, who appears in the form of a boar. However, no other sculpted figure of Varaha is known from this period.

The key question is whether the object is authentic. It was first published by two archaeologists, Sanjay Kumar Manjul and Arvin Manjul, in the archaeological journal Pragdhara. It is accepted by Rakesh Tiwari, the director of the Uttar Pradesh state archaeological department. Ahuja, the curator of the Brussels exhibition and an associate professor of Indian art at Jawaharlal Nehru University, is also convinced that it is ancient. In his catalogue, he dates it to the second to first millennium BC.

Ahuja admits that forgeries have come onto the market and that he was immediately suspicious, but he believes this figure is ancient. “The patina is most important: it was examined in the Archaeological Survey of India’s laboratories and established as authentic,” he says. “The inscription has letters that are undoubtedly an archaic Brahmi script. The boar-like form, akin to the incarnation of Varaha, is certainly too unique to be forged.”

Richard Blurton, the British Museum’s curator of South Asian Art, who advised on the Brussels exhibition, was very interested to see the figure, although he has not yet had a chance to study the find. “It is a fascinating object and I am delighted that it is being brought to scholarly attention,” he says.
For those who dont know, these anthropomorphs are common in North India dating around 1500 BC.








But that one has inscriptions, Indus type figure, and a boars head.
 
Last edited:
Feb 2013
724
#2



Maybe related, maybe not. If so, these ideas, figures, etc. have been inside Indian thought for a very long time!
 
Last edited:
Mar 2012
453
#4
If the artifact is authentic, this would confirm that the unicorn is a representation of Vishnu.

It would confirm that this Indus seal represents the Trimurti--notice the 'fish' symbol. Maybe the reason op artifact takes that shape is because it is also referencing Matsya.

 

tornada

Ad Honoris
Mar 2013
15,385
India
#5
There's an enormous lack of clarity as to what those things were. Some argue that they are human representations, others that they are tools. They are commonly associated with the Copper Hoard Culture, which was a contemporary of the IVC. We don't know much beyond that, and any association with later deities particularly on the basis of depiction alone is premature given the lack of data
 

tornada

Ad Honoris
Mar 2013
15,385
India
#8
Couple of points:
1. That thing doesn't look like a unicorn, simply a deer.
2. The Boar's head might not be a head, it might just be badly cast.


Either way, a single piece of evidence is usually not the best way to build a theory, particularly one that connects two cultures of which one we know practically nothing about and the second we can only make educated guesses about purpose since we have no literature regarding their culture
 
May 2013
1,721
The abode of the lord of the north
#9
Couple of points:

2. The Boar's head might not be a head, it might just be badly cast.
I disagree ... Thing does resembles Boar and even have a mouth like wedge. Too much for a coincidence.

But no arguments with rest. Connecting it with vishnu is far too much
 

tornada

Ad Honoris
Mar 2013
15,385
India
#10
I disagree ... Thing does resembles Boar and even have a mouth like wedge. Too much for a coincidence.

But no arguments with rest. Connecting it with vishnu is far too much
You miss my point. I was saying it might not necessarily be a boar. It could be an ox, a deer or even some supernatural animal. Of-course it could also be a forgery - has anyone dated it? I noticed it has a lot more verdigris on it than the other humanoid/tool objects unearthed (I don't know if these things have a noun to themselves), maybe just the picture, but can anyone confirm the authenticity of this object?
 

Similar History Discussions