Lord Macaulay’s address to the British Parliament in 2 February, 1835.

May 2010
277
India
#1
Lord Macaulay’s address to the British Parliament in 2 February, 1835:

"I have traveled across the length and breadth of India and I have not seen one person who is a beggar, who is a thief. Such wealth I have seen in this country, such high moral values, people of such calibre, that I do not think we would ever conquer this country, unless we break the very backbone of this nation, which is her spiritual and cultural heritage, and, therefore, I propose that we replace her old and ancient education system, her culture, for if the Indians think that all that is foreign and English is good and greater than their own, they will lose their self-esteem, their native self-culture and they will become what we want them, a truly dominated nation."

Henry Kissinger,the time of the turkish invasion in Cyprus, while addressing a group of Washington, D.C. businessmen in Sept.1974:

"The Greek people are anarchic and difficult to tame. For this reason we must strike deep into their cultural roots: Perhaps then we can
force them to conform. I mean, of course, to strike at their language, their religion, their cultural and historical reserves, so that we can
neutralize their ability to develop, to distinguish themselves, or to prevail. Thereby removing them as an obstacle to our strategically
vital plans in the Balkans, the Mediterranean, and the Middle East, to all this neuralgic territory of great strategic importance for us, for
the politics of the USA."

Does not both sound similar? Two great nations, which once were the greatest of the greats in their spheres of influence falling prey to a strategy aimed at their culture?
 
#2
Great, British were very clever rulers! No doubt.

Lord Macaulay’s address to the British Parliament in 2 February, 1835:

"I have traveled across the length and breadth of India and I have not seen one person who is a beggar, who is a thief. Such wealth I have seen in this country, such high moral values, people of such calibre, that I do not think we would ever conquer this country, unless we break the very backbone of this nation, which is her spiritual and cultural heritage, and, therefore, I propose that we replace her old and ancient education system, her culture, for if the Indians think that all that is foreign and English is good and greater than their own, they will lose their self-esteem, their native self-culture and they will become what we want them, a truly dominated nation."

Henry Kissinger,the time of the turkish invasion in Cyprus, while addressing a group of Washington, D.C. businessmen in Sept.1974:

"The Greek people are anarchic and difficult to tame. For this reason we must strike deep into their cultural roots: Perhaps then we can
force them to conform. I mean, of course, to strike at their language, their religion, their cultural and historical reserves, so that we can
neutralize their ability to develop, to distinguish themselves, or to prevail. Thereby removing them as an obstacle to our strategically
vital plans in the Balkans, the Mediterranean, and the Middle East, to all this neuralgic territory of great strategic importance for us, for
the politics of the USA."

Does not both sound similar? Two great nations, which once were the greatest of the greats in their spheres of influence falling prey to a strategy aimed at their culture?
Great, British were very clever rulers! No doubt.
 
Aug 2010
16,176
Welsh Marches
#3
These both seem to be classic examples of internet apocrypha. How could Macaulay have said that in the British parliament in 1835 if he left for India in 1834, and did not return to England until 1838? An internet search reveals that there is no mention of this supposed statement before 2002, and it does not appear in Hansard (for any date!), as it would if he had ever said that in parliament. In other words, this is a fiction that has been inserted into Macaulay's mouth.

The Kissinger statement looks to me to be fictional too, as I've remarked when it has posted here before.
 
Aug 2010
16,176
Welsh Marches
#4
P.S. Some links I have found:

The merits of Lord Macaulay

Sunday Posts: Lord Macaulay's Quote on India

As the latter blogger remarks, 'there were two oddities about this quote. First, the language, which appeared too modern. Second, this was far too obvious and too cynical for Macaulay, who was an apologist of the empire, and believed in its high moral purpose. The quote was obviously a fraud.'

Furthermore, could anyone really claim to have travelled through India and never have come across a single beggar!? Not only is this a fraud, but it is obvious at first sight that it is a fraud. People really ought to think twice before passing on such nonsense.
 

Naomasa298

Forum Staff
Apr 2010
33,731
T'Republic of Yorkshire
#5
Wasn't the Colonels' junta in power in Greece in 1974? What possible threat or obstacle could they have posed to USA hegemony in the Balkans, Mediterranean or the Middle East that could have compelled Kissinger to make that kind of statement in public?
 
Aug 2010
16,176
Welsh Marches
#6
The Greeks were obviously not important enough to justify the use of that apocalyptic language. And Kissinger was not daft enough to talk about striking at their language and (good God!) their religion! The best that I can find as a source for this rubbish is the '14 August 1997 edition of the Greek magazine, Economicos Tachidromos, quoted Kissinger as having said this in an interview in Munich with Greek host, Pavlo Bakoyianni' ! A good provenance.
 
Aug 2010
16,176
Welsh Marches
#7
Here we are, the origins of this myth:

Ο μÏ�θος για τη δήλωση ΚίσινγκεÏ� « Οι λÎ*ξεις Î*χουν τη δική τους ιστοÏ�ία

It's in Greek I'm afraid, but cites a letter that Kissinger wrote at the time pointing out that that it was false. The supposed statement was first published in a Turkish paper.

Machine translation:
Google Translate
 
Last edited:
Aug 2010
16,176
Welsh Marches
#8
Correction:

I said above that the 'Macaulay' passage couldn't be traced beyond 2002, it is in fact rather more ancient, originating as long ago as 1998, in an American 'gnostic' publication called the Awakening Ray. Little could they have known what they were starting!

This is the culprit:
Gnostic Centre
 

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