Los Angeles Airport Shooting November 1 2013

Sep 2013
136
NC
#1
[ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yu_GLFlT3zw]Los Angeles Airport Shooting November 1 2013 - YouTube[/ame]


A lone gunman opened fire at Los Angeles International Airport in Southern California early Friday, killing at least one person, injuring several more and prompting authorities to evacuate a major terminal at LAX.

At a press conference late Friday morning, officials confirmed that they had taken into custody a suspect believed to be responsible for a rampage that started earlier that day at around 9:20 a.m. local time.
 

Nemowork

Ad Honorem
Jan 2011
8,254
South of the barcodes
#3
From the sound of it he's an ex or current TSA employee who came in specifically to shoot other TSA screeners.

Fairly average workplace violence except for the location.
 
Feb 2013
169
Maryland, USA
#4
Another one of these? It could just be me, but I feel like these mass shootings are either getting more common or they're getting more media coverage these days than I remember them getting before.
 
Last edited:
Oct 2013
357
Pennsylvania
#5
Maybe it's because Americans are getting fed up with the proliferation of guns in this country - and the ridiculous hold a certain gun organization has on our politicians.
 

Edgewaters

Ad Honorem
Jul 2007
9,098
Canada
#7
Not really, in fact over the last few years opposition to gun control has actually increased:

Has Public Opinion Really Changed Regarding Gun Control? - Forbes
The article actually argues that it has not:

Looked at over a period of time, Americans view on gun control remains rather stagnant. In fact, opinions on gun control from 1993 to 2012 show that it’s nearly a dead heat between those who want to control gun ownership, and those who want to protect it.

It goes on to state that after serious incidents, appetite for gun control usually rises (albeit temporarily). Nowhere in the article does it argue that opposition is increasing. Rather, it concludes that by February 2014, opinion should look similar to April 2012 just before the Sandy Hook and Batman massacres (presuming there are no further incidents ... such as this one).
 
Last edited:
Oct 2012
8,545
#8
The article actually argues that it has not:

Looked at over a period of time, Americans view on gun control remains rather stagnant. In fact, opinions on gun control from 1993 to 2012 show that it’s nearly a dead heat between those who want to control gun ownership, and those who want to protect it.

It goes on to state that after serious incidents, appetite for gun control usually rises (albeit temporarily). Nowhere in the article does it argue that opposition is increasing. Rather, it concludes that by February 2014, opinion should look similar to April 2012 just before the Sandy Hook and Batman massacres (presuming there are no further incidents ... such as this one).
I was referencing this part of the article:

At the start of the Bill Clinton administration in 1993, 57 percent of Americans polled by the Pew Research Center said it was very important to control gun ownership. That rose to a whopping 66 percent in favor of stricter gun control by the time he left office in 2000. It remained relatively stable even throughout the eight years of President George W. Bush.

Only when Obama took over did the mood start to change. It went from 60 percent in favor of gun control to just 49 percent. In 2012, it was a minority of 47 percent in favor of stricter gun laws and 46 percent in favor of the status quo.

Recent gun violence have had little impact in swaying the public, despite the outrage at the time of their occurrence.

Shortly after the “Batman shooting” in Aurora, Colo on July 20, 2012, a minority 48 percent wanted stricter gun control and 52 percent wanted to protect gun owners’ rights in a poll taken a week after the movie theater shooting that killed 12 people watching a midnight viewing of “The Dark Knight Rises”. While that interest in gun control did rise from a similar poll taken in April of that same year, it rose from around 45 percent in favor of stricter gun laws.

Polls can be tricky. We’re a fickle bunch. A lot depends on the questioning.

According to a series of CBS News polls asking if gun control laws should be made more strict, less strict or stay the same, 53 percent said it should be more strict when asked in the first week of February. That number remained within the margin of error from a similar poll taken in the first two weeks of January by CBS, with 54 percent saying they were in favor of stricter gun laws. Just after Sandy Hook, those in favor was 59 percent.

It’s been falling ever since.

If this keeps up, Americans will likely be where they were in April 2012, when only 39 percent said gun laws should be stronger; 41 percent said they should be kept as they are and 13 percent said they should be loosened further.
It seems that since the 2008 elections, support has been, in general, on the decline.
 

Edgewaters

Ad Honorem
Jul 2007
9,098
Canada
#10
I was referencing this part of the article:



It seems that since the 2008 elections, support has been, in general, on the decline.
But you're cherry-picking the article ... his point is that despite temporary swings and trends, influenced by events and politics, there is a long-term consistency (or "stagnation" as he puts it) over a much broader period of time than just the last few years.
 

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