Manchu Queue in inner asia

Sep 2018
46
Germany
There is no law in the Qing code which states bannerman can't marry outside of the banners, including Han civilians, but its a historical tradition that they do not marry people from the outside. Only Qing royalties occasionally marry Mongols because of political alliances, but not the Zunghars. However, Qing royalties also married with Wu Sangui's family, so its the same with the Han. There are almost no instance of Manchus marrying Uighurs outside of Rong fei (fragrant concubine), but that's an exception to the norm. There is really no standard marriage ideologies for the Manchus, they married outside of the banners for political reasons.
Thank you very much for your answer!
I wanted to ask you what you think about the claims of this paper "Interethnic marriage in Northeast China, 1866–1913 Bijia Chen Cameron Campbell Hao Dong":

"The policies that governed marriages between bannermen and civilians changed over time. Right after the Qing was established, intermarriage between Manchu and Demographic Research: Volume 38, Article 34 Demographic Research 937 Han was encouraged in order to reduce tensions between the two groups. However, the policy did not work well and the Qing court quietly canceled the policy soon afterwards (Rawski 1991: 181–182). Subsequently, intermarriage between bannermen and civilians was prohibited during the early Qing, mainly to prevent Manchu women from marrying Han men. Starting during the reign of Kangxi (1661–1722), men in the Eight Banners were allowed to marry Han women under specific conditions. This practice became common during the Qianlong period (1736–1795). The prohibition against intermarriage between the banners and Han was revived in the Jiaqing period (1796– 1820) and then relaxed again in 1865. The rule that forbade daughters of bannermen from marrying Han civilian males was amended so that it applied only in Beijing (Ding 1999: 343–344)."

Thanks in advance.
 

heavenlykaghan

Ad Honorem
Mar 2012
4,435
There are written articles in the Qing code and then there are ruling through precedence. Forbidding Han marriage with Manchus was never written in the Qing codes, but was often decided by individual emperors as policies and might retrospectively be acted upon later based on precedence. Han and Uighur marriage doesn't seem to have been banned, but its against custom. However, we see some criminal cases in Xinjiang of Han having affairs with married Uighur women and was punished accordingly. The same probably apply to the bannerman, but since they are soldiers, they were probably more controlled; making cases of homosexual rape more common in the legal archives.
 
May 2019
156
Earth
Don't want to hijack the thread, but out of curiosity, did the Albazinians have to wear the queue? Or were they exempt? I believe their later descendants did (judging by this picture at least), but I don't know if that was by choice or law...
 

heavenlykaghan

Ad Honorem
Mar 2012
4,435
The so called "new Manchus" under Qianlong were later interpreted to be Manchus. During Kangxi's time, Heilongjiang was considered a frontier region and not an internal constituent of the empire.