Manuscript

May 2016
974
Nabataea
#31
صاحب رسول الله سلمان الفارسى، the companion of the Prophet of God Salman the Persian. The Persian is written الفارسى instead of الفارسي. Which makes me almost certain that it was done by an Egyptian.
 

Tulun

Ad Honorem
Nov 2010
3,615
Western Eurasia
#32
Yes, thank you, also as an option.

Hence, it is not clear who wrote this, and what kind of comment? Are there analogs?

But, how do AncientA write that the manuscript is Egyptian?

I had a manuscript of 1818 (from Tatarstan), there it was written at the end that the author had written the book himself, and he had finished that in 1818. The manuscript was also written in Arabic.

I regret that I sold this book for pennies)). Perhaps there were unique reflections.

I will not sell this book.

And by the way, do you need a full copy of this document?))

I can make such a copy in PDF format.

Well, while I was able to conclude only that the manuscript was probably written somewhere in Egypt not earlier than the 15th century (since the commentary on the writings of the author of the 15th century)?



And what does this text mean? It already goes after the main text, several sheets.

Well this page that you posted lists sufi saints from the Naqshbandi order as i could spell out some names (the middle of the fifth line from the top also writes al-Naqshbandiyat) and the titles used before them is also sufi terminology (like "qutb" "pole"/"axis"). it looks like a chain of sufi masters in the Naqshbandi order. Whoever wrote it, belonged to the Naqshbandi order i think, also i guess he could be either Perso/or Turkophone, at least i guess from the frequent use of Khwaja/hoca (teacher), but i don't know, was it also adopted by Arabophones? :think:

They were/are widespread in Crimea, Tataristan, Caucasus, Turkey, Central Asia (where it originated from), India, Syria, Palestine.
 
Last edited:
Sep 2018
82
Russia
#33
Well this page that you posted lists sufi saints from the Naqshbandi order as i could spell out some names (the middle of the fifth line from the top also writes al-Naqshbandiyat) and the titles used before them is also sufi terminology (like "qutb" "pole"/"axis"). it looks like a chain of sufi masters in the Naqshbandi order. Whoever wrote it, belonged to the Naqshbandi order i think, also i guess he could be either Perso/or Turkophone, at least i guess from the frequent use of Khwaja/hoca (teacher), but i don't know, was it also adopted by Arabophones? :think:


That is, the Egyptians had the manuscript, and then went to the Persians?

Well, it's written after the main text. Could it be written by other people, not those who wrote the main text?
 
Sep 2018
82
Russia
#34
Well this page that you posted lists sufi saints from the Naqshbandi order as i could spell out some names (the middle of the fifth line from the top also writes al-Naqshbandiyat) and the titles used before them is also sufi terminology (like "qutb" "pole"/"axis"). it looks like a chain of sufi masters in the Naqshbandi order. Whoever wrote it, belonged to the Naqshbandi order i think, also i guess he could be either Perso/or Turkophone, at least i guess from the frequent use of Khwaja/hoca (teacher), but i don't know, was it also adopted by Arabophones? :think:

They were/are widespread in Crimea, Tataristan, Caucasus, Turkey, Central Asia (where it originated from), India, Syria, Palestine.
And what is written in this text? It seems to me that it is written in a slightly different handwriting than the main part of the manuscript?





 

Tulun

Ad Honorem
Nov 2010
3,615
Western Eurasia
#35
That is, the Egyptians had the manuscript, and then went to the Persians?

Well, it's written after the main text. Could it be written by other people, not those who wrote the main text?
yes it could be written by another person too, but personally i wouldn't draw any conclusion as of now regarding the origin of the main body of the manuscript either (i'm personally not convinced about the Egyptian origin of the text, but i have no knowledge on it to make definite judgement). it certainly needs more study and more opinions from different people :D
 
Sep 2018
82
Russia
#37
yes it could be written by another person too, but personally i wouldn't draw any conclusion as of now regarding the origin of the main body of the manuscript either (i'm personally not convinced about the Egyptian origin of the text, but i have no knowledge on it to make definite judgement). it certainly needs more study and more opinions from different people :D
Excuse me, I forgot to take off the photo of the very first sheet of the manuscript!

And here is what is written?

 

Tulun

Ad Honorem
Nov 2010
3,615
Western Eurasia
#38
And what is written in this text? It seems to me that it is written in a slightly different handwriting than the main part of the manuscript?





again the script is too difficult for my beginner level, but these three pages doesn't look Arabic for me, ( AncientA opinion? :) Persian?
 
May 2016
974
Nabataea
#39
again the script is too difficult for my beginner level, but these three pages doesn't look Arabic for me, ( AncientA opinion? :) Persian?
The writing style is pain in the arse. It appears to be in Arabic moving slightly upwards for whatever reasons. I could pickup alot of sentences (تتبع اثار السلف, التطوع وطول القنوت etc.).
 
Sep 2018
82
Russia
#40
The writing style is pain in the arse. It appears to be in Arabic moving slightly upwards for whatever reasons. I could pickup alot of sentences (تتبع اثار السلف, التطوع وطول القنوت etc.).

And what is written on the first page of the manuscript?

 

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