Mao Zedong's Military Achievement

sparky

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
4,802
Sydney
#3
.
Let's not exaggerate , the military brain was Chu teh and the communists did about nothing much against the Japanese , by the Imperial Army own report

the main Kuomintang did most of the fighting

they just couldn't they had very few weapons and no heavy ones

their success were local against miserable provincial Kuomintang commanders
 
Oct 2013
4,574
Canada
#5
The long March is a piece of Chinese Foundation mythology but he lost 90% of his forces; not really a success ...
.
Let's not exaggerate , the military brain was Chu teh and the communists did about nothing much against the Japanese , by the Imperial Army own report

the main Kuomintang did most of the fighting

they just couldn't they had very few weapons and no heavy ones

their success were local against miserable provincial Kuomintang commanders
In the end who won? Who achieved military supremacy?
 
Aug 2015
1,861
Los Angeles
#7
.
Let's not exaggerate , the military brain was Chu teh and the communists did about nothing much against the Japanese , by the Imperial Army own report

the main Kuomintang did most of the fighting

they just couldn't they had very few weapons and no heavy ones

their success were local against miserable provincial Kuomintang commanders
Also Lin Biao in the civil war period.
 
Feb 2011
6,459
#9
No one said the Long March was anything but hard. But it wouldn't have happened in the first place if the Red army listened to Mao and kept at their guerilla/mobile warfare tactics, which allowed the Communists to beat back the first four Encirclement Campaigns launched by Chiang despite being outnumbered and outgunned. But by the fifth Encirclement Campaign, the Red Army decided to ignore Mao and switch to conventional warfare. They lost, badly, and unlike the Nationalists they don't have the resources to shrug off a major defeat. Hence the Long March.

You play to your strengths, not to your weaknesses. It's the same when dealing with the Japanese. The Nationalists had much better equipment than the Communists yet the ratio of casualties were heavily lopsided in favor of the Japanese by 10 to 1 anyway. Why do people expect that Mao should fight conventionally like how Chiang fought the Japanese? That's just tossing bodies into the grinder. Chiang had no choice but to fight conventionally, not only did he have cities to protect, but he was the face of China and needed to show the Americans that China was giving the Japanese a bloody nose (which would gain him more American support and maybe even drag the US into the war). Mao had a choice, why throw that advantage away?

But don't take it from me, let's hear what the Japanese have to say.

General Hatta reported: "the Communist bandits... are the chief disturbing factors endangering peace and order. They are not only handicapping the admministrative progress but also undermining the work of reconstruction of a New China. Furthermore, under the pretext of offering resistance, the Communists are actually bent upon expanding their influence for selfish purposes. In the pacification of North China, suppression of the Communists is a matter which should not be overlooked."
On a 1943 Japanese broadcast: "The work of detecting the fleeing enemy forces is not an easy matter even with the aid of the air units who report to us the positions of the enemy... Therefore, our forces are able to seek out only a small number at a time, and then pursue them. The harships that our imperial forces are facing today may be well imagined."
From 春二回忆文献 (Japanese veteran's Memoir): "When fighting the Eighth Route Army, there were an average of 40 engagements per month. Under these conditions, having a couple lives is not enough."
 
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sparky

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
4,802
Sydney
#10
.
The long march was a success , it was a retreat and they lived to fight another day

Mao didn't start it but insisted in pursuing it well beyond it's original goals
Chu teh disagreed , went for the more populated areas and got his butt kicked ,
he barely escaped back to the main column with few of his men , having learned a valuable lesson
 

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