Mauser Rifle

Apr 2010
1,075
evergreen state, USA
I recall seeing in one of these threads that the Spanish army in Cuba had Mausers, and it was bloodily effective against the American army there for a time.
 
May 2019
385
Earth
I recall seeing in one of these threads that the Spanish army in Cuba had Mausers, and it was bloodily effective against the American army there for a time.
Loads of countries around the turn of the 20th century had Mausers, either locally produced variants or imports. And their use wasn't just limited to state armies either. The Irish Volunteers in 1914 imported a boatload of M1871s from a German arms dealer.
 

martin76

Ad Honorem
Dec 2014
6,953
Spain
German Mauser was used by Ottoman Armies and Persian ones... so... not difficult to go from Germany to Persia and from Persia to Aghanistan... still in nineties you can find lot of weapons market in Persia... in the Afghan borders!
 

martin76

Ad Honorem
Dec 2014
6,953
Spain
I recall seeing in one of these threads that the Spanish army in Cuba had Mausers, and it was bloodily effective against the American army there for a time.
Yes. but it was the Spanish Mauser.. not the German one. It was made in Trubia. in Asturias.

 

Zip

Jan 2018
766
San Antonio
I recall seeing in one of these threads that the Spanish army in Cuba had Mausers, and it was bloodily effective against the American army there for a time.
As I understand it the main advantage of the Mauser over the Krag used by the American regulars was the fast and easy charger (stripper clip) reloading. The Krag was a modern bolt gun with a very smooth and fast action but it had an odd magazine on the side of the receiver which was loaded one round at a time; very fiddly.

The Krags were very well made and are nice to shoot. Many were converted to hunting rifles and the Krag 30-40 round put many a deer on the table.

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Zip

Jan 2018
766
San Antonio
Note that during the Spanish-American War that while American regulars had the modern Krag rifle many state volunteer troops used obsolete Indian Wars era Springfield black powder breech loading rifles. The "trap door" was an excellent rifle of its type but still...

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pikeshot1600

Ad Honoris
Jul 2009
10,094
The Krag-Jorgensen is an interesting rifle and it looks cool. However, the US army began replacing it with the M1903 Springfield in the first decade of the 20th century. The Krag was retained for second line units (engineers, signals and so on) and served through WW I.

The Norwegian army and navy used the Krag in some forms until the 1940s. German occupation resulted in the Norwegian fascists (Quisling security troops) using the Krag after the army surrendered.

The 1903 Springfield effectively was a Mauser, the workings of the rifle being the same. IIRC, the War Dept paid Mauser $1,000,000 for a license to make the rifle, and a royalty was paid for every one built.
 
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pikeshot1600

Ad Honoris
Jul 2009
10,094
Incidentally, the 1903 Springfield remained in use with the US army and navy through WW II. The 1st Marine division went ashore on Guadalcanal with the navy pattern Springfield in 1942.

[Everyone of course understands that if there was an "army pattern," there also had to be a "navy pattern" rifle, right? :D]

When I went through boot camp, we drilled and marched with 1903 navy Springfields.
 

Zip

Jan 2018
766
San Antonio
Incidentally, the 1903 Springfield remained in use with the US army and navy through WW II. The 1st Marine division went ashore on Guadalcanal with the navy pattern Springfield in 1942.

[Everyone of course understands that if there was an "army pattern," there also had to be a "navy pattern" rifle, right? :D]

When I went through boot camp, we drilled and marched with 1903 navy Springfields.
I used to have an 03-A3, the simplified WWII version with the rear peep sight. Nice rifle and a real tack driver though somewhat punishing when shooting military surplus ammunition. I preferred my SMLE, made in 1918 at Enfield. Pakistani army surplus .303 was cheap and plentiful at the time and had a gentler recoil than 30-06.