Medieval austrian painting depicting bulgarians in battle?

#1
Hi guys, the question at hand is about this "painting" (fresco)



[ame="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Master_of_the_Saint_Lambrecht_Votive_Altarpiece"]Master of the Saint Lambrecht Votive Altarpiece - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia[/ame]

According to this site:
Lessingimages.com - Master Saint Lambrecht(Hans von Tuebingen). Victory of Ludwig I the Great
the "painting" represents a victory over bulgarians (maybe the moment in which Bdin was occupied by Ludwig in the second half of the XIV-th century). According to others, the loosing side are some tuks or vlachs. So can you share any info about it, have you seen it before, what do you think about the (presumably) bulgarian clothing? Judging by eagles on the "tzar's" robe I can say it looks eastern - byzantine style of clothing... To me it doesn't look like a battle, but more like an ambush.
 
Last edited:
Jul 2013
746
Australia
#2
First, it is a painting, no need for quotes. It is not a fresco as a fresco is painted on damp plaster and this is painted on a panel of wood.

Even if it did represent the early 14th century victory of Ludwig I the Great of Hungary, the costume is probably based on what the artist saw around him (in 15th century Styria or wherever) and his idea of eastern dress, which is not very accurate as he has given an easterner a crown. The Lessing Archive may have confused "in Bulgaria" for "over the Bulgarians".

However if Hemma of Gurk (c. 980 – 27 June 1045) was there in person rather than as an apparition, then it represents an 11th century event.

Druzhina
Illustrations of Costume & Soldiers
 
Last edited:
May 2011
832
Bulgaria
#3
According to what I found in the Internet, the painting represents Louis I of Hungary's victory over Radul I in July 1377. The painting is described as victory over the Bulgarians since Radul was a voevoda of the Bulgarian tzar (Radano principe di Bulgaria infedelle, according to an Italian chronicle). There was a trade conflict between Hungary and Bulgaria over high custom taxes in Transilvania. The Hungarians won, but Radul was not killed back then. The Eastern look on some of the soldiers is explained by Radul's allegiance. At the time there were two Bulgarian tzars. Although it seems likely that he was fighting for Ivan Sratsimir in Vidin, who had family connection with the voevoda, the other tzar Ivan Shishman, who was in the capital of Turnovo, is considered the most probable ruler. It is known that Ivan Shishman employed many foreigners as mercenary troops. There were Frankish quarters in the capital, cavalry from the Golden Horde and even Turkish mercenires. So that can explain the looks of the soldiers. I just read in a site "According to soruces there were both Bulgarians and Turks in Radul's army", but I could not find what the exact source was. Will add it once I find it.

In XII-XIV c. Balkans the fashion for crowns was a dome shape. Not sure why Radul's looks like this, but it looks close to the one in the painting:
 

Tulun

Ad Honorem
Nov 2010
3,805
Western Eurasia
#4
According to what I found in the Internet, the painting represents Louis I of Hungary's victory over Radul I in July 1377. The painting is described as victory over the Bulgarians since Radul was a voevoda of the Bulgarian tzar (Radano principe di Bulgaria infedelle, according to an Italian chronicle). There was a trade conflict between Hungary and Bulgaria over high custom taxes in Transilvania. The Hungarians won, but Radul was not killed back then. The Eastern look on some of the soldiers is explained by Radul's allegiance. At the time there were two Bulgarian tzars. Although it seems likely that he was fighting for Ivan Sratsimir in Vidin, who had family connection with the voevoda, the other tzar Ivan Shishman, who was in the capital of Turnovo, is considered the most probable ruler. It is known that Ivan Shishman employed many foreigners as mercenary troops. There were Frankish quarters in the capital, cavalry from the Golden Horde and even Turkish mercenires. So that can explain the looks of the soldiers. I just read in a site "According to soruces there were both Bulgarians and Turks in Radul's army", but I could not find what the exact source was. Will add it once I find it.
i think the only primer sources on the 1377 battle are Andrea Gattaro's and Guglielmo Cortusi's chronicles, i haven't read them but if somebody has access to Muratori's Rerum Italicarum Scriptores vol. XVII. p. 231 and vol. XII. p. 984. can check the full accounts. It is maybe online somewhere.
 

Tulun

Ad Honorem
Nov 2010
3,805
Western Eurasia
#6
thanks i found there Gattaro's chronicle, here the account is on page 145 (i think my source used an earlier edition?)

https://archive.org/details/p1arerumitalicarums17card
starting with
MCCCLXXVII.
Una vitoria ch'ebe el re d'Ungaria sopra infedely.
Nonistante ch'io escha fuora d'Itallia, non è però da darmi reprensione, perch'io vi
retornerò. Fu adunque nele parte d' Ongaria una grandenisima bataglia tra la santa maghie-
stà del re Lodovigo e Radano, prinzipo di Bulgaria, infedelle ; cioè che da una parte e da
l'altra fu quaranta milia persone per parte, e fugli una grande ucisione de infedelli e chri-
stiani, ma più de 'nfedelli, e fu quasi per eser el re quasi rotto da infedelli : e la caxione fu
perché la Signoria donò agli infedelli X armadure da cavallo, i quali x armati cargo sovra
la persona del re Lodovigo e quaxi fu per eser prexo ; ma l'auxillio di Dio sopravenne, e
de' forteza e vitoria al re Lodovigo, per muodo che tu' gli 'nfe[d]elli fu rotti e grande quan-
tità morti e prexi; dela quale vitoria il re d'Ongaria ne scrisse al signore di Padoa, perché
l'era cierto che d'ogni sua vitoria ne saria gaudioxo: la letera che scrisse il ditto re holtra
qui è la coppia 4 * * :

...
and then a latin language copy of a letter of king Louis from Buda

Im not into medieval Italian to translate it :S

but didn't find the vol 12. part 5 where Cortusi's chronicle is, probably because it is still copy right protected
[ame=http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rerum_Italicarum_scriptores]Rerum Italicarum scriptores - Wikipedia[/ame]
 
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