Metal or alloy on Mars Identification

Apr 2017
747
Lemuria
I need someone who is familiar with metals and metallic ores to help me identify the object in the video below. It is a 3D video of NASA Curiosity rover on mars. You need to put the video on 1080 p (not lower for lack of detail not higher, unless you have a higher resolution screen else there will be aliasing distortion). Now look in front of the front left wheel. You'll find a sort of metallic object the rover is clearly analysing (the rover has an arm to do analysis on Marsian rock). So do you think this naturally occurring or artificial? I need someone competent in this field to help me with the analysis and the reasoning behind your analysis. The object seems to contain aluminium. Please confirm. 1080 and video below. Pause it and you can rotate and zoom in (call me crazy there seems to a Zeta Reticulan head in the video as well if you follow the rover tracks).


 
Mar 2017
878
Colorado
The only way to tell what it is ... is spectrographic analysis, which breaks it down into it's elements. It's not positive for the TYPE of rock gneiss, schist, etc ... but you can make a decent guess from what's in it.

I walk my dogs every single day on dirt roads which contain a lot of mica and a lot of tiny quartz chips. On garbage day, there's often "collateral litter" so I keep my eye on the ground for things that can hurt my dogs. MANY times, I see the Sun solidly reflecting off of a piece of glass at a distance of 30' or more. When I bend down to pick it up, it's usually quartz/mica with a clean face that hits the Sun "just right". Just looking at rocks from a distance doesn't tell you much. Geologists often "taste" rocks to identify them. There's also a human psychology thing that goes on with unfamiliar shapes: we automatically try to see patterns that look familiar ... like seeing a face in clouds, or a face on the surface of Mars.
 
Apr 2017
747
Lemuria
The only way to tell what it is ... is spectrographic analysis, which breaks it down into it's elements. It's not positive for the TYPE of rock gneiss, schist, etc ... but you can make a decent guess from what's in it.

I walk my dogs every single day on dirt roads which contain a lot of mica and a lot of tiny quartz chips. On garbage day, there's often "collateral litter" so I keep my eye on the ground for things that can hurt my dogs. MANY times, I see the Sun solidly reflecting off of a piece of glass at a distance of 30' or more. When I bend down to pick it up, it's usually quartz/mica with a clean face that hits the Sun "just right". Just looking at rocks from a distance doesn't tell you much. Geologists often "taste" rocks to identify them. There's also a human psychology thing that goes on with unfamiliar shapes: we automatically try to see patterns that look familiar ... like seeing a face in clouds, or a face on the surface of Mars.
Don't go off topic about quartz. How do you describe the material you see? Such as colour, unusual shape, corrosion level (surface as opposed to where the rectangular holes are), contrast with surrounding etc. Just stay objective. An expert can tell you a lot with one look.
 

Dan Howard

Ad Honorem
Aug 2014
5,000
Australia
An expert can tell you a lot with one look.
Not from a photo or video. You'd need the item in your hand to view it under natural light at various angles, feel the weight and texture, scratch it to approximate its hardness and to see its colour under the patina, to tap it and listen to its resonance, and to taste it as mentioned above. The colours in a digital photo are dependent on the type of lens used, the type and amount of lighting, the size and type of CCD chip, and the jpeg compression settings. Then the colours change even more when you view it on a computer depending on the video card, the computer monitor, the lighting, and the settings. You can make copper look like iron with only a small alteration to the settings on either the camera or the computer.

There is nothing in that video that isn't naturally-occurring, no matter how much you wish it to be otherwise.
 
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Apr 2017
747
Lemuria
Not from a photo or video. You'd need the item in your hand to view it under natural light at various angles, feel the weight and texture, scratch it to approximate its hardness and to see its colour under the patina, to tap it and listen to its resonance, and to taste it as mentioned above. The colours in a digital photo are dependent on the type of lens used, the type and amount of lighting, the size and type of CCD chip, and the jpeg compression settings. Then the colours change even more when you view it on a computer depending on the video card, the computer monitor, the lighting, and the settings. You can make copper look like iron with only a small alteration to the settings on either the camera or the computer.

There is nothing in that video that isn't naturally-occurring, no matter how much you wish it to be otherwise.
Analyze it at 1080 and no other resolution. Use only the material you have at hand and nothing else. Describe what you see. Anything else not connected to what you see is of no relevance to the discussion. This is not for the casual but someone really familiar with metals and who can work with limited data. If you cannot use the available material to extract information there is no point in debating. I'm not interested in the limitations of the data sample provided. I'm interested in how much additional data one can mine from it. I'm hoping for the right person to show up and help me with the analysis or message me.
All I can derive from your post is you can't make any distinction between the sample and the surrounding.
 
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Dan Howard

Ad Honorem
Aug 2014
5,000
Australia
There is no point making an analysis because there is nowhere near enough data. You can't get an accurate picture without seeing an object at multiple angles in natural light without distortion from cameras. I still remember all the boofheads who thought that there was a human face carved into the surface on Mars. It is too easy for us to be fooled by optical illusions. The brain automatically interprets and distorts new sights into objects that are familiar to us. You can't trust what you think you see unless it is corroborated with data from our other senses.
 
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specul8

Ad Honorem
Oct 2016
3,447
Australia
It will be iron .... because iron is the metal of Mars .

Maybe it is a piece of the chisel that carved this ;



1538944302947.png
GOD Buddha statue on mars


?