Mexican steamship production in the 19th century?

May 2019
218
Earth
Simple question, did Mexico develop the capacity to produce steamships of any tonnage during the 19th century? If so, were they all coastal/littoral craft, or did any have ocean-going capabilities? I know almost nothing about shipbuilding in Mexico after the Spanish left, so I'd be interested to learn a little.
 

betgo

Ad Honorem
Jul 2011
6,439
I don't know much about it, but I don't think Latin America developed much of a ship building industry. High end ships were probably bought from the US or Europe. There were trade and manufacturing restrictions on Spanish America as on what became the US in colonial times, and I don't think Spanish America developed much high end industry in the 19th century.
 
May 2019
218
Earth
I don't know much about it, but I don't think Latin America developed much of a ship building industry. High end ships were probably bought from the US or Europe.
I did get curious whether shipbuilding might have been one of the industries pushed by Porfirio Diaz in his modernization programmes. He certainly worked on improving Mexico's road and rail infrastructures during his time in office, and opened Mexican industry to foreign (particularly US) investment...

There were trade and manufacturing restrictions on Spanish America as on what became the US in colonial times, and I don't think Spanish America developed much high end industry in the 19th century.
Mexico did have some functional shipyards during Spanish times. The port of Acapulco, for example, had the capabilities for repair and maintenance of the large Manila Galleons, as well as building its own ships. Zihuatanejo was where the ships of Alvaro de Saavedra Ceron's exploration into the Pacific in 1527 were built. The problem is that these (and other) shipbuilding ports of Spanish Mexico were producing wooden sailing vessels. I don't know if any were modernized during the steam era under independent Mexico...
 

betgo

Ad Honorem
Jul 2011
6,439
High technology manufacturing was mostly in northwestern Europe and the northeastern US. That Mexico was building ships in 1527 does not mean it was building steam ships in the 19th century.

Certain areas were much more advanced in technology etc. This partly led to European control over most of the world and the decline of the Spanish, Ottoman, Russian, Austrian, and Chinese empires. Most Nobel Prizes for Science have gone to citizens of Germany, France, the UK, or US.
 
May 2019
218
Earth
High technology manufacturing was mostly in northwestern Europe and the northeastern US.
China, Japan, and Australia are all non-European, non-US countries that built steamships. Obviously the center of technological development was in the regions you mentioned, but that does not mean that nobody else was able to build steam-powered vessels of any size during the 19th century.

That Mexico was building ships in 1527 does not mean it was building steam ships in the 19th century.
Obviously. But it also doesn't mean that they didn't. I'm not making assumptions, I'm just asking if they did. If you don't know, that's fine.
 

betgo

Ad Honorem
Jul 2011
6,439
China, Japan, and Australia are all non-European, non-US countries that built steamships. Obviously the center of technological development was in the regions you mentioned, but that does not mean that nobody else was able to build steam-powered vessels of any size during the 19th century.

Obviously. But it also doesn't mean that they didn't. I'm not making assumptions, I'm just asking if they did. If you don't know, that's fine.
I don't know and maybe someone will reply who does. However, Mexico did not have the level of technology etc. in the 19th century of the countries you mention.