Military Literature

VHS

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
4,180
Brassicaland
#1
As long as humans have existed, there have been physical confrontations; even without military literature, the oral societies still have experience-based military traditions and practices.
Military literature here is a broad topic; it includes treatises, historical texts, fictional works, soldiers' records, and much more.
The "myth" is that the East, especially China, has a much longer tradition of written military guides, and one of the most famous is the Arts of War.
The West has its own military guides as well, and one of the most famous is Carl Von Clausewitz's On War.
Currently, massive fictional military works are being written, and most of them are by amateurs.
As far as military history is concerned, very few of them were written by soldiers anyway.
Huang Renyu (黄仁宇) is known as a former soldier who became a relatively famous historian.
What should be considered the most valuable forms of military literature?
Do soldiers necessarily produce "better" military literature?
How do you rate "military treatises"?
 
Feb 2016
4,065
Japan
#2
It’s a broad subject and the importance will depend on what aspect of military history you value.

I’m most interested in the day to day kifecof somdiers, uniform details, and low level tactics.... so personally I enjoy reading diaries and letters of contemporary soldiers..
 
Likes: Talbot Vilna

Chlodio

Ad Honorem
Aug 2016
3,239
Dispargum
#3
For most of military history, at least in Europe, soldiers were expected to be brave, loyal, and obedient, not intelligent. A man who could think was assumed to be disloyal, disobedient, and possibly a coward, too. Bravery, loyalty, and obedience were qualities associated with men who could not think for themselves. Sons of the nobility and other men destined for military careers were deliberately not educated. They read very little and wrote even less. Conseqently, many works of military literature were written by non-soldiers.
 

VHS

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
4,180
Brassicaland
#4
For most of military history, at least in Europe, soldiers were expected to be brave, loyal, and obedient, not intelligent. A man who could think was assumed to be disloyal, disobedient, and possibly a coward, too. Bravery, loyalty, and obedience were qualities associated with men who could not think for themselves. Sons of the nobility and other men destined for military careers were deliberately not educated. They read very little and wrote even less. Conseqently, many works of military literature were written by non-soldiers.
Mass education is a relatively recent thing.
In theory, the Chinese often talked about bravery without wisdom or intelligence as 匹夫之勇 (the bravery of a single), which is an insult for foolhardiness.
 
Likes: Ichon