Military Vehicles, Good and Not So Good

Vaeltaja

Ad Honorem
Sep 2012
3,635
#21
I see your 'bad' tanks and raise with BT-42


Combining the fearsome speed of the Christie suspension using Soviet BT-7 together with mighty 114 mm piece of British artillery expertise and arming it with German made hollow charge shells... What could possibly go wrong?

Quite a bit as it turned out. Sure BT-7 used to be fast but after slapping on that gun and the turret it was anything but swift. Well, it was fairly swift to topple over. And somewhat non-surprisingly suspension did not really being saddled with that turret either. But the good old BT-7's gasoline engine was retained - you know, just to make it even more flammable. Main gun was indeed an example of British artillery expertise, but it predated the Great War. Since it was such a 'perfect' fit to the BT-42 no one even installed a machine gun to the tank.

The armor basically struggled to stop ordinary rifle rounds, being slow and overweight it had 'mild' problems with maneuvering, main gun was inaccurate and since it used separately loaded charge it was very slow to load. Turret was bulky, it did rotate but it wasn't powered, but at least it had pistol firing ports (extra holes is always a 'brilliant' idea to have in a tank).
 
Likes: sailorsam
Oct 2016
933
Merryland
#22
The tank was never a failure, the only failure being that it wasn't properly used by the leadership of the time.

When the first 6 pdr RAMs rolled at the beginning of 1942 it was easily the best Allied tank (non-Soviet) available, hands down better than the Crusader or Grant tank.


It was later used as the first APC - the RAM Kangaroo
thanks for the info!
this is exactly the sort of thing I started this thread for.

thanks Vaeltaja, I'd never seed or heard of the BT-42 before. hm, maybe there's a reason for that.
 
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Sep 2017
610
United States
#23
I see your 'bad' tanks and raise with BT-42


Combining the fearsome speed of the Christie suspension using Soviet BT-7 together with mighty 114 mm piece of British artillery expertise and arming it with German made hollow charge shells... What could possibly go wrong?

Quite a bit as it turned out. Sure BT-7 used to be fast but after slapping on that gun and the turret it was anything but swift. Well, it was fairly swift to topple over. And somewhat non-surprisingly suspension did not really being saddled with that turret either. But the good old BT-7's gasoline engine was retained - you know, just to make it even more flammable. Main gun was indeed an example of British artillery expertise, but it predated the Great War. Since it was such a 'perfect' fit to the BT-42 no one even installed a machine gun to the tank.

The armor basically struggled to stop ordinary rifle rounds, being slow and overweight it had 'mild' problems with maneuvering, main gun was inaccurate and since it used separately loaded charge it was very slow to load. Turret was bulky, it did rotate but it wasn't powered, but at least it had pistol firing ports (extra holes is always a 'brilliant' idea to have in a tank).
"In one encounter, a Finnish BT-42 hit a Soviet T-34 18 times, failing even to immobilize the enemy vehicle, as this vehicle's fuses failed to work correctly."
 
Oct 2016
933
Merryland
#25
Tairusiano, that looks like something out of Mad Max!

wonder how much other amateur armor is out there?


somebody posted this on another thread. WWII Soviet truck. note one headlight!!!

(and curtains for doors!)

 
Oct 2016
933
Merryland
#26


Italian truck from WWII. those guys look happy that they're not walking!

(note the camouflage up front)

edit; Canadian

"An open-topped CMP (Canada Military Pattern) 3-ton truck and motorcycle of 11th Royal Horse Artillery (Honourable Artillery Company), 1st Armoured Division, 22 April 1943. From the IWM via Wikipedia."
 
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Oct 2016
933
Merryland
#29


Czech-built Tatra T111.

"The T111 was developed and manufactured during World War II as a heavy truck for use by the Wehrmacht. Production started in 1942 and continued for twenty years, ending in 1962 when it was replaced by the Tatra 138. Despite being built for the Nazi war machine, the vehicle ultimately played an important role after the war ended. The Tatra 111 contributed significantly to the rebuilding effort during the postwar era, mainly in Eastern Europe and the USSR."

Pugs, you might be right. I was googling and this came up in a search for Italian trucks. will see if I can find original source.
 
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pugsville

Ad Honorem
Oct 2010
8,325
#30
supposed to be a Polish Armored Car (WZ-34). I hear very little about armored cars in WWII. were they used much? mostly for urban combat?
scouting, reconnaissance units , they could travel much quicker than tanks (though mainly on roads or relatively un-rough ) urban combat would be the one of their least happy roles. Generally their role is about gaining information not about fighting.

Germans produced 50,000 tanks (Pz I and up) and around 4-5,000 armored cars (from my quick internet research)

The British produced much more 10,000 armored cars and around 10,000 Scout cars (think armored cars without a real gun , turret but open topped)
(for much the same 47,000 actual tank production, and universal/Lloyd Bren gun carriers something like 200,000) The British actually produced many more armored vehicles (if count armored cars, scout cars and carriers)

The Dingo had impressive cross country performance.

 

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