Military Vehicles, Good and Not So Good

Oct 2016
1,047
Merryland
#42
thanks Murf
never knew was such a thing

hows this for some ice transport



the source said they had no doors so the driver could escape if the truck fell through the ice!
I believe this is the frozen lake road (Stalingrad?)
 
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Bish

Ad Honorem
Dec 2011
8,206
Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk.
#43

The Stridsvagn m/30 and m/31 were very interesting tank designs sharing some unique, if not outright revolutionary features that never saw widespread use outside of Sweden. The most important, and most obvious of these, is the fact that they were equipped with large wheels that could be raised and lowered with minimal effort; when crossing rough terrain the vehicle would travel on treads like any other tank, but on roads the wheels would be lowered and allow for absolutely astounding speeds - up to 75 km/h (most main battle tanks today only travel at around 70 km/h)! In spite of this, its armor was perfectly adequate for a light tank of the time (6-14 mm for the m/30, 8-24 mm for the m/31), the Bofors 37 mm gun could take out any interwar light tank at a respectable distance, and it consumed relatively small amounts of fuel. Unfortunately, only 4 such models were built due to financial constraints which also rendered many reliability flaws unattended to, and the period of Swedish rearmament starting in 1939 saw simpler and more mainstream tank designs being produced instead. But I, for one, certainly wouldn't mind maneuvering my tank divisions with the speed of cars!


The Sd.Kfz 254 was originally built as an artillery tractor for the Austrian army. A dozen or so had been built at the time of the German take over and the Germans carried on building it and around 150 or so were completed. Mainly used as artillery observation vehicles.
 

AlpinLuke

Ad Honoris
Oct 2011
25,233
Lago Maggiore, Italy
#44
Tanks or toys?

Mussolini and the Fascist regime had a curios conception of "armored division". This picture has become proverbial in Italy.


 
Jun 2012
2,959
Brazil
#45
Tairusiano, that looks like something out of Mad Max!

wonder how much other amateur armor is out there?
Thanks, I was searching for images of more Vehicles of these times, and found three tank units built in Brazil, "based" on the FT-17 tanks, pretty interesting, they are even used in the assault to a city.







source in portuguese.
http://www.ecsbdefesa.com.br/fts/REV30BN.pdf
 

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Oct 2016
1,047
Merryland
#46
thanks for posts / pics

Bish, I was reading about Japan in WWII and the author mentioned that they never captured any significant industrial plant, while the Germans got the Skoda works and a lot of industry in France. Austria certainly counts in that.

Alpinluke, it's been said many times that the Italian army was well equipped to fight Ethiopians and Eritreans but was not really up to West Europe.

Tairusiano, don't those units look comical to us today? I read somewhere that Brazil imported a bunch of M3 Stuart tanks, which weren't much use to the allies but were a significant upgrade for Brazil.
 
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Bish

Ad Honorem
Dec 2011
8,206
Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk.
#48
thanks for posts / pics

Bish, I was reading about Japan in WWII and the author mentioned that they never captured any significant industrial plant, while the Germans got the Skoda works and a lot of industry in France. Austria certainly counts in that.

Alpinluke, it's been said many times that the Italian army was well equipped to fight Ethiopians and Eritreans but was not really up to West Europe.

Tairusiano, don't those units look comical to us today? I read somewhere that Brazil imported a bunch of M3 Stuart tanks, which weren't much use to the allies but were a significant upgrade for Brazil.
Indeed and of course they continued to build Czech tanks that were in production at the Skoda works and these formed a big part of German forces at the early stages of the war.
 

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