Military Vehicles, Good and Not So Good

Mar 2014
6,535
Beneath a cold sun, a grey sun, a Heretic sun...
#64
would youse guys care to elaborate on CMP and 'Queen of the Desert'? don't feel like googling today.

The CMP - Canadian Military Pattern - was a unique collaboration between Ford and GM, the two rivals even sharing some parts. There were over ninety variants on twelve different chassis, but the standard was a 3-ton 4x4. Canada's CMP production accounted for half of all military vehicles produced in that country, and alone by itself outstripped the entire motor vehicle production of all the axis powers combined. The Ford F15 and Chevy C15 saw service into the 1960s.
 

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Likes: sailorsam

caldrail

Ad Honorem
Feb 2012
5,150
#67
thanks Murf
never knew was such a thing

hows this for some ice transport



the source said they had no doors so the driver could escape if the truck fell through the ice!
I believe this is the frozen lake road (Stalingrad?)
Lake Ladoga, during the siege of Leningrad. vehicles did fall thought the ice and drivers were lost. bear in mind that the waters were freezing. Human beings have seconds to get out before the cold weakens them, and death is certain within minutes. The reality of being in a vehicle entering a body of water is that opening doors is impossible - only when the pressure stabilises on both sides - such as when the vehicle hits the bottom and fills with water - can a human being push a door open underwater.

My favourite tanks are those from WW1. There were quite a few experiments and some managed to see limited service by the major combatants. Sometimes a little heath robinson, sometimes genuinely revealing of where AFV design was going to go.
 
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Likes: sailorsam
Oct 2016
933
Merryland
#68
Lake Ladoga, during the siege of Leningrad. vehicles did fall thought the ice and drivers were lost. bear in mind that the waters were freezing. Human beings have seconds to get out before the cold weakens them, and death is certain within minutes. The reality of being in a vehicle entering a body of water is that opening doors is impossible - only when the pressure stabilises on both sides - such as when the vehicle hits the bottom and fills with water - can a human being push a door open underwater.
yikes!!! :eek:

talk about Ice Road Truckers...



looks like this guy is running with door open
 
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Nemowork

Ad Honorem
Jan 2011
8,243
South of the barcodes
#69
yep, if the truck starts to go through the ice hes got a second or two more to jump clear.


As mentioned above, if he goes into the water his chances of survival are about zero, nobodies going to have enough time to pull him out.
 
Likes: sailorsam
Jan 2015
3,182
Rupert's Land ;)
#70
Yes: Failure in the sense that it never did get used as designed.
Not really a good definition of failure, the B-52 and the Trident missile weren't "failures" just because they were not used in a nuclear war .

However, if it had been committed, I suspect there would have been much whining about the sponson doors,
I guarantee that the crew of Grants and Crusaders killed by flying rivet shards wouldn't be complaining about the fully-cast RAM, with 170% to 200% of armour compared to the weaker tanks

and unfavourable comparisons with the 75mm Sherman, which came shortly after.
Shortly? The British Sherman's would be arriving a year later, not "shortly"
 

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