Mining in ancient ages

Jan 2015
2,932
MD, USA
#21
Allow me to doubt it.

The mines in Carpathian were Hungarian Kings Monopoly practically from the establishment of the Hungarian kingdom, the salt mines were a state monopoly even in AH period.

The salt mines were one of the keys of King's richness (=> power). King Mathias (14-15th c) was maybe the richest European Monarch.
Thanks, I didn't know that! Honestly, I was shooting my mouth off a little, economics is hardly my strong area, but the impression I get is that most business was not directly government-owned. Though there were always regulations and laws, etc.

Matthew
 
Jul 2019
6
Turkey
#22
I've been making mail for twenty years and still have trouble getting the riveted links to look like museum examples.
I've seen couple videos on those riveted mails, looks like they were the common type because of its strength. But also it looks even more harder, I mean how do you clinch those tiny rings closed :D

I guess a different scenario was the case in each place then. Overall it looks like it was more of a private business depending on what you guys said. Which is kinda interesting because I didn't know civil economic attempts were this powerful. Most representations of the medieval & ancient era don't focus on these things, and rather show the things that government & army do.
 

deaf tuner

Ad Honoris
Oct 2013
14,422
Europix
#23
Thanks, I didn't know that! Honestly, I was shooting my mouth off a little, economics is hardly my strong area, but the impression I get is that most business was not directly government-owned. Though there were always regulations and laws, etc.

Matthew
guess a different scenario was the case in each place then. Overall it looks like it was more of a private business depending on what you guys said. Which is kinda interesting because I didn't know civil economic attempts were this powerful. Most representations of the medieval & ancient era don't focus on these things, and rather show the things that government & army do.
It wasn't that exceptional (in the sense of "unusual" or "rare").

Principally speaking, the state (=> ruler/king/Lord) owned the territory, thus being the owner of it's resources.

Practically, some resources were too precious, or too strategic for the power to not have/take control of them. Since ancient Rome, in Europe state/rulers at least kept a hand on the industry, if not controlling it until late. It's simply too much money involved.

Unlike we might be tempted to think, salt mines are a very good example, as for long, salt was in fact more precious (more lucrative) than gold.

In Hungary/AH, salt monopoly brought to the crown the same amount (if not more) than all other taxes all together.

BTW, a couple of links:

Ancient Rome (Hispania): Bronces de Vipasca - Wikipedia, la enciclopedia libre

Germany: https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&sou...Vaw3ni438qAZxItaA9kLmejIo&cshid=1562356838565

Russia: Science Tribune
 
Last edited:

Similar History Discussions