Modern little known musical gems

stevev

Ad Honorem
Apr 2017
2,771
Las Vegas, NV USA
In terms of hits, this is VK's most popular video with over 9.5 million hits since 2009. To a certain extent she is constrained by the song. YT comments praise her handling of Slash's famous guitar solo. But overall I'm not as impressed as I am with her handling of Death's "Voice of the Soul".(previous page). There's more there to work with IMO and she does it very well. Since she recorded Voice of the Soul in 2017 we'll have to wait 8 years to see if it will match Guns 'N Roses but it doesn't matter. Quality isn't measured by youtube hits.



 
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stevev

Ad Honorem
Apr 2017
2,771
Las Vegas, NV USA
Modern jazz is probably an acquired taste, but it can be rewarding if you take the time to understand it. Here is a discussion of John Coltrane's break through composition played across three keys. I don't know about modern "classical" but its something not even traditional classical composers have attempted. Some modern pop artists have touched on two keys as mentioned here. Only samples of Coltrane's work are played. If you like it, there's long list of choices of originals and covers on youtube. Note a true jazz piece is never played exactly the same way more than once.

 

stevev

Ad Honorem
Apr 2017
2,771
Las Vegas, NV USA
This is one of many covers of Giant Steps ^ on YouTube. I chose it because it's much easier to follow then Coltrane's high speed playing. Note that while it is a cover, the group is doing its own improvisations over the three keys of the original composition.

 

stevev

Ad Honorem
Apr 2017
2,771
Las Vegas, NV USA
While John Coltrane was and still is the essence of modern progressive jazz, Dave Brubeck has been labeled too "commercial " in his time. Worse, his quartet was POPULAR. For jazz insiders, the true artists, that's virtual expulsion from the faith. But jazz is all about improvisation and this one on Billy Strayhorn's 1930's classic hit deserves respect. With Paul Desmond (tenor sax) starting off, it goes way out to places no other jazz improvisation has ever been with this popular standard. It seems they will never get back to the opening phrase, but they do somehow.

 
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Modern jazz is probably an acquired taste, but it can be rewarding if you take the time to understand it. Here is a discussion of John Coltrane's break through composition played across three keys. I don't know about modern "classical" but its something not even traditional classical composers have attempted. Some modern pop artists have touched on two keys as mentioned here. Only samples of Coltrane's work are played. If you like it, there's long list of choices of originals and covers on youtube. Note a true jazz piece is never played exactly the same way more than once.

Free jazz is even harder to appreciate. I haven't found anyone who could last 30 seconds listening to this:

 

stevev

Ad Honorem
Apr 2017
2,771
Las Vegas, NV USA
Free jazz is even harder to appreciate. I haven't found anyone who could last 30 seconds listening to this:
Sounds like the Great Brazilian Chicken Massacre of 2018.

Brazilian chickens slaughtered as striking truckers paralyze supplies | Reuters

Whoever called that jazz is committing blasphemy and be treated like those chickens!

At least I hope you listened to the Coltrane cover and the Brubeck piece. I agree Coltrane's playing is not fully appreciated without training but I thought the C.A.L.I. group's cover was pretty accessible.
 
My favourite version of Giant Steps is by Rahsaan Roland Kirk who was heavily influenced by John Coltrane (like so many great saxophonists of the 60s & 70s).


An astonishing live performer, capable of playing 3 saxophones at the same time & could even play the recorder with his nose. He was blind too.

 

stevev

Ad Honorem
Apr 2017
2,771
Las Vegas, NV USA
My favourite version of Giant Steps is by Rahsaan Roland Kirk who was heavily influenced by John Coltrane (like so many great saxophonists of the 60s & 70s)
.

Yes. Roland Kirk was pretty popular with the wider public for a jazz artist. I've enjoyed listening his stuff over the years. While Coltrane was probably the leading influence in mainstream jazz in the 60's and 70's this kind of playing goes back to Charles Parker. He only lived to age 35 but he totally revolutionized the genre. Coltrane is really an extension of Parker. Beginning in the late 1930's his playing was a total break from the popular jazz of the time such as Benny Goodman. He was already experimenting with variations in tonality and rapid fire playing when he was barely out of his teens.

 
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