Monuments you hold the dearest

Aug 2009
5,408
Athens, Greece
#1
Still shocked by the fire that ravaged Notre Dame de Paris, I realised how great sentimental value certain monuments have, irrespective of their country of origin or culture that gave birth to them. I also observed how moved several historumites were by the fire destruction in the Parisian cathedral, understandably so in a history focused community, however, the concern was not limited to such circles but was global as well - in media and ordinary people alike. It was on the lips of common folk here where I live, as if something of their own was endangered, which might seem somewhat strange, considering that Notre Dame is a French and Catholic monument and here is an overwelmingly Orthodox country. Still, it seems that certain monuments have the power to affect people beyond what nationality, religion or culture would have made expectable or obvious, thus becoming a pan-human heritage, something that all humans can relate to and be moved by.

So, in the aftermath of this near catastrophe and having avoided the worst, for which monuments would you feel the greatest sorrow seeing them damaged or destroyed? Which you hold dearest? This isn't about which are considered the most important, in an academic sense, but which are closest to your heart, therefore a subjective and personal view. Nothing to be argumentative about here, this is just a tribute to those wonderful creations of our species and the kind of discussion people have when someone or something they love narrowly escaped a fatal blow.
 
Likes: Linschoten
Jul 2016
8,410
USA
#4
True, however there is a lot of space to be filled within a human soul. Without cultural creations, humans would have been much, much more empty, poor, and ultimately, less of what makes them truly human.
But at the end of the day, the Notre Dame Cathedral is still just a building and nothing more. Sure its pretty, but its just a man made structure. Nothing lasts forever, so I personally save my heartache for those temporary things that actually matter, other people, especially ones I hold dear.
 
Aug 2010
15,468
Welsh Marches
#5
Medieval cathedrals are the buildings that mean most to me, and there many that I love both at home in England and on the Continent; but I would have to pick out Salisbury Cathedral as being 'my' one, having lived near it for years and having seen it in every kind of weather at every time of year. It may not be the finest (the interior is not that wonderful) but outside it is like a massive single sculpture, with one of the finest of all cathedral spires that can be seen for miles around. The sight of it at the distance would always be the sign that I was really coming home, and it would unfailingly make my heart jump.

salisbury-cathedral.jpg

Inside it has the oldest working clock in the world (it doesn't have a face):

salsclock.jpg

As a sort of bonus, it was often painted by John Constable, the painter who portrays best what I most love about the English countryside.

Conssals.jpg

At a less monumental level, this is the sort of place that I most love, old country houses from the 16th or 17th centuries, not too big, built of the local stone, set in a sea of green:

Owlpen_in_2007.jpg
 
Likes: LatinoEuropa
Oct 2013
13,498
Europix
#6
There are a couple of them for me.



One is Frauenkirche in Dresden.



It's almost a "take this" to their Catholic prince of those Saxon Lutheran commoners. A Baroque madness, theatre church, an architectural folly ... a 12.000 tons stone dome !?!



Friedrich the 2nd did bombed this Saxon outrage, only to see his cannonballs bouncing of the dome ... verdammte Sächsisch Kopf ...
"You too, take this!"



Allied started bombing Dresden on 13th February, the next morning, the dome was there, standing, the bombing continued on the 14th, the next morning, the dome was still there ...
"You too, take this!" ...



But around 10 in the morning, the 1000°C surrounding fires had finallycracked that obnoxious Saxon stone head defying for all too long all too many ....






It's only that is to know little humans and them sticking on to their (useless?!?) simbols.



The dome is there again, ready to defy the next hot head.






Dressed up as in it's youth, with all those colors, so deliciously almost Kitch, so almost indecently theatrical










"Gals, Guys, it's me again!"
 
Feb 2019
217
Pennsylvania, US
#7
Hmmmm... do artifacts and statuary count as "monuments" on this thread? Not quite monuments, but some 4,000+ years old... lost, vandalized and restored.
 
Aug 2009
5,408
Athens, Greece
#9
But at the end of the day, the Notre Dame Cathedral is still just a building and nothing more. Sure its pretty, but its just a man made structure. Nothing lasts forever, so I personally save my heartache for those temporary things that actually matter, other people, especially ones I hold dear.
Some man made structures are not just "buildings and nothing more". They are the epitomes and symbols of whole historical eras, civilisation advances, cultural feats, human achievements. I beg to differ in dismissing them as simply pretty or, just buildings.

I do agree however that nothing compares to live people, especially loved ones. There's not even a point in discussing this, I don't think anyone would make that comparison.
 
Aug 2009
5,408
Athens, Greece
#10
Medieval cathedrals are the buildings that mean most to me, and there many that I love both at home in England and on the Continent; but I would have to pick out Salisbury Cathedral as being 'my' one, having lived near it for years and having seen it in every kind of weather at every time of year. It may not be the finest (the interior is not that wonderful) but outside it is like a massive single sculpture, with one of the finest of all cathedral spires that can be seen for miles around. The sight of it at the distance would always be the sign that I was really coming home, and it would unfailingly make my heart jump.

View attachment 17930

Inside it has the oldest working clock in the world (it doesn't have a face):

View attachment 17931

As a sort of bonus, it was often painted by John Constable, the painter who portrays best what I most love about the English countryside.

View attachment 17932
What a superb way to mark homecoming, that grand spire there!

I have to admit I'm also partial to Gothic cathedrals, as far as architecture is concerned, Gothic and ancient Greek are my preferred styles. Roman, Romanesque and baroque, not so much.

At a less monumental level, this is the sort of place that I most love, old country houses from the 16th or 17th centuries, not too big, built of the local stone, set in a sea of green:

View attachment 17933
Is there a more English scenery than this? :)
 

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