Monuments you hold the dearest

Aug 2010
16,205
Welsh Marches
#61
I think we can respect each others' points of view, no?

On an unrelated point, I wonder if we can appreciate certain buildings more as ruins rather than as restorations.
Sorry, that wasn't directed at you; I'm perfectly willing to respect the relevant poster's point of view (it's not compulsory to like old buildings) but I think we got the message the first time that he told us!

I have of a view of a ruined castle from my window, I would shoot anyone who tried restore it. Over-restoration of an insensitive kind can wreck a building (as with Windsor Castle in my view), but people are much more conscious of the need for authenticity nowadays.
 
Jul 2016
9,679
USA
#62
Sorry, that wasn't directed at you; I'm perfectly willing to respect the relevant poster's point of view (it's not compulsory to like old buildings) but I think we got the message the first time that he told us!

I have of a view of a ruined castle from my window, I would shoot anyone who tried restore it. Over-restoration of an insensitive kind can wreck a building (as with Windsor Castle in my view), but people are much more conscious of the need for authenticity nowadays.
I'm replying to individuals who replied to me in something called a discussion. If you don't want to read my replies to other posters, then don't read them. Don't try to silence me because you're emotionally invested in things with at least four walls and a roof.
 

Willempie

Ad Honorem
Jul 2015
5,305
Netherlands
#63
I think we can respect each others' points of view, no?

On an unrelated point, I wonder if we can appreciate certain buildings more as ruins rather than as restorations.
I am sure we can appreciate certain modern buildings more when they turn into ruins.

Ie the Walkie Talkie in London

The officially elected ugliest building of Holland (city hall of Hardenberg)
1555535083432.png
 
Aug 2010
16,205
Welsh Marches
#65
I'm replying to individuals who replied to me in something called a discussion. If you don't want to read my replies to other posters, then don't read them. Don't try to silence me because you're emotionally invested in things with at least four walls and a roof.
Nah, just bored by your blathering.
 

Naomasa298

Forum Staff
Apr 2010
35,039
T'Republic of Yorkshire
#68
I have of a view of a ruined castle from my window, I would shoot anyone who tried restore it. Over-restoration of an insensitive kind can wreck a building (as with Windsor Castle in my view), but people are much more conscious of the need for authenticity nowadays.
I was thinking about the Colosseum in Rome. Our view of it is as a ruin and we appreciate it as such. I think if it was restored, we would be conscious that it was a restoration, and we wouldn't appreciate it as much.

I've been to a few reconstructed Japanese castles. Osaka castle was, at one time, the largest castle in Japan, but all that's left of the original structure are some of the walls and foundations. The keep is a modern, ferroconcrete replica, and based on what the castke was believed to have looked like. Inside, it's a thoroughly modern building which serves as a museum. While I like it, it's not the same as visiting the real thing at all.

Wasn't it Albert Speer who came up with the concept of designing buildings to leave magnificent ruins?
 
Aug 2010
16,205
Welsh Marches
#70
I was thinking about the Colosseum in Rome. Our view of it is as a ruin and we appreciate it as such. I think if it was restored, we would be conscious that it was a restoration, and we wouldn't appreciate it as much.

I've been to a few reconstructed Japanese castles. Osaka castle was, at one time, the largest castle in Japan, but all that's left of the original structure are some of the walls and foundations. The keep is a modern, ferroconcrete replica, and based on what the castke was believed to have looked like. Inside, it's a thoroughly modern building which serves as a museum. While I like it, it's not the same as visiting the real thing at all.

Wasn't it Albert Speer who came up with the concept of designing buildings to leave magnificent ruins?
If that is true of Speer, that is wonderfully ironic in the circumstances. I find that there is something disquieting about places that have been reconstructed after being largely destroyed in war, Ypres, with its formerly amazing cloth hall, is positively spooky. One is constantly aware that one is in a sort of simulation and the architecture feels somehow dead.
 

Similar History Discussions