More than 20 killed in Papua New Guinea massacre

Oct 2013
14,293
Europix
#14
Well, we mostly hear about violent tribes. So, for every 1 violent tribe you could have 5 peaceful ones, yet the violent ones would get all the attention and people will think that all tribes are violent.
'Tis.

As they say since long in press: 100 trains arriving in time isn't news, the 1 arriving late is news.
 
Likes: Futurist
Aug 2014
4,472
Australia
#18
But up in the highlands it always has been. They make their own version of hooch or jungle juice or whatever you want to call it.
The main difference today is the introduction of modern weapons. Tactics have changed too. They used to settle disputes with one pitched battle at a prearranged location away from settlements. Today there are ambushes, specific targeting of individuals, and deliberate attacks on housing.

 

Belgarion

Ad Honorem
Jul 2011
6,651
Australia
#19
I have visited PNG twice, and have had some interaction with the military and police there. The central government has little real authority outside the larger towns and even there it can be shaky. Tribalism is the way of life and ritual killings and cannibalism still occur. The thing is that most of the perpetrators do not see this as wrong but as the normal way of settling disputes. When there for PNG independence in 1975 myself and a few others hired a car to visit some of the military sites around Rabaul. We were told on no account to stop if we had an accident, even if we had run over someone, or even a chicken or pig, but to head straight back to town and report to the car rental place, NOT to go to the police. To do otherwise was to run an excellent chance of being killed on the spot by irate tribesmen. This was after 70 odd years of Australian administration. Since independence things have become worse.
 
Mar 2019
1,247
Kansas
#20
I have visited PNG twice, and have had some interaction with the military and police there. The central government has little real authority outside the larger towns and even there it can be shaky. Tribalism is the way of life and ritual killings and cannibalism still occur. The thing is that most of the perpetrators do not see this as wrong but as the normal way of settling disputes. When there for PNG independence in 1975 myself and a few others hired a car to visit some of the military sites around Rabaul. We were told on no account to stop if we had an accident, even if we had run over someone, or even a chicken or pig, but to head straight back to town and report to the car rental place, NOT to go to the police. To do otherwise was to run an excellent chance of being killed on the spot by irate tribesmen. This was after 70 odd years of Australian administration. Since independence things have become worse.
Rabaul huh........I used to work for Burns Philp