More than half a century since the Silent Spring by Rachel Carson

VHS

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
4,553
Florania
#1
I thought I would write a review on the book; then, I decide to make a general discussion.
The book was a report with recommendations; then, how have things changed since then?
How disastrous was the spraying in the 1950s and the 1960s? I know many members have lived through this time.
If bureaucracy and connections were related to these disasters, are they still like that?
The book includes a few rather specific scientific materials; I can somehow understand while I ignore the details.
Do these details reduce the accessibility of the book?
This is the first time I read a "scientific report"; what would you think if this book is used in English classes?
 

Bart Dale

Ad Honorem
Dec 2009
7,095
#2
We take more consideration in using pesticides, and have stopped using some of those regarded as the worst, such as DDT. Doesn't mean pesticides are not still abused, but at least some thought is given about potential impact.

But new unforeseen problems pop up. The vulture population in Inda has been decimated in India, for example, because an antibiotic given to cows to prevent them from getting sick is lethal to Indian cultures, and when the vulture feast on a cow corpse , they die. Same antibiotic was used in North America without problems, because NA vultures are not affected by the antibiotic.
 
Sep 2012
9,171
India
#3
I thought that the Indian Vulture population ( not Indian 'culture ' as typed rather wistfully ) declined because their eggshells broke too often when the birds were incubating them, due to DDT getting into the eggshells of Vultures ( do not remember by what route), as far as I recall.
 

Bart Dale

Ad Honorem
Dec 2009
7,095
#4
I thought that the Indian Vulture population ( not Indian 'culture ' as typed rather wistfully ) declined because their eggshells broke too often when the birds were incubating them, due to DDT getting into the eggshells of Vultures ( do not remember by what route), as far as I recall.
No, the root cause of the recent collapse of the vulture population in India is due to the anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac (not an antibiotic as I had mistakenly said earlier).

Indian vulture crisis - Wikipedia


Now DDT does cause egg shells to become thin and too fragile, and that may have been when India was using DDT more, and may still be a problem, since India still uses DDT to control malaria, but this is much, much worse. Adult cultures are being killed, and some vulture populations ha$ been reduced by 99% by 2008.
 
Sep 2012
9,171
India
#5
Diclofenac is still being used as a painkiller in human medicine in India. I note that is still being used in Spain, inspite of Spain knowing about the Diclofenac risk to vultures via animal carcasses. It is true that Vultures in India used to be quite common, I myself had seen crowds of them feasting on cow/buffalo carcasses, when I was a schoolboy walking a long way to my school. It is also true that the vulture population has declined noticeably. I do not think that Diclofenac, as such, is being diverted from human consumption to animals. Our crooks do not have the education and competence to divert a chemical for such a use.
In the extreme, let the vulture go extinct rather than our teeming animal population suffer some inflammatory diseases.
For your information, there used to be bedbugs all over India, hidden in the beddings of middle-class households in my childhood. Now after sprays of some insecticide, bugs have totally disappeared from every household, rich or poor! Bedbugs in India are deservedly extinct!
 

VHS

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
4,553
Florania
#8
It was surprising to see that even in cold regions like Toronto, Canada, bed bugs are alive and well!
Due to the issue of bedbugs (and the idea of filth in my family) in libraries, I have not loaded library items for 10 years plus!
 
Sep 2012
9,171
India
#10
We had our house sparrows population ( Passer Domesticus) decline dramatically a few years ago when I thought maybe this bird was on the way of being extinct. But, no, they have made a rebound and are back again in usual strength.