Most competent leader of the early 12th century?

Feb 2019
472
Thrace
I'm working on a timeline of the most competent leaders in history and there's a gap between El Cid(1099) and Emperor Taizu of Jin(1015).

Alexios Komnenos is placed before El Cid, while David the Bulder after Taizu, so I need someone else to fill that gap. The Chinese Emperors don't seem especially impressive, Ahmad Sanjar didn't reach peak reputation until after 1115, and Holly Roman Emperor Henry IV seems to have been in quite of a pickle.

My options so far:

1. Vikramaditya VI; he covers the entire gap

2. Include both Yusuf ibn Tashfin of the Almoravid dynasty and Baldwin I of Jerusalem(the first crusade ended in 1099 and I assumed Baldwin got the better of it, so to speak)

Are any of these 3 rulers fitting of the "greatest leader alive" tag? Can someone suggest a better inclusion if not?
 

Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
5,877
Portugal
You probably know my opinion about these ratings, but I can always make a suggestion: Urraca of León (1079-1026).

On a side note, you rated El Cid better than Alfonso VI of León and Castile?
 
Feb 2019
472
Thrace
You probably know my opinion about these ratings, but I can always make a suggestion: Urraca of León (1079-1026).

On a side note, you rated El Cid better than Alfonso VI of León and Castile?
I...did. :oops: Am I off with that assessment?
 

Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
5,877
Portugal
Well, El Cid is a fascinating character and was a strong warlord, is quite famous due two works, a epic poem, “El cantar de mio Cid”, and “Historia Roderici”, and I could add more recently a movie from Hollywood.

But he supported Sancho against Alfonso, and Sancho died, he had to swear allegiance to Alfonso. Then he didn’t deal well with the intrigues in the court and was expelled while Alfonso grew in power conquering important strong places and finally took Toledo (1085). Rodrigo’s biggest military achievement was probably the conquest of Valencia (1094), but his territories, nominally under Alfonso, didn’t last longer and felt again in Muslim hands. Diferent men, diferent tasks in hand. Alfonso achieved more had left a stronger inheritance. Don’t know if that is enough to rate him better.
 
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Feb 2011
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Bohemond of Taranto, Prince of Taranto, Prince of Antioch - and his Nemesis, Alexius I Komnenos of Eastern Roman Empire.
 
Feb 2019
472
Thrace
Bohemond of Taranto, Prince of Taranto, Prince of Antioch - and his Nemesis, Alexius I Komnenos of Eastern Roman Empire.
I thought about him but Alexios is placed before El Cid in the chronology and from 1100 onward, Bohemond isn't very successful.
 
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MAGolding

Ad Honorem
Aug 2015
2,933
Chalfont, Pennsylvania
I thought about him but Alexios is placed before El Cid in the chronology and from 1100 onward, Bohemond isn't very successful.
Alexios I Komnenos was emperor from 1081 to 1118 as I remember, so part of his reign includes the period 1099-1115.
 
Feb 2019
472
Thrace
Alexios I Komnenos was emperor from 1081 to 1118 as I remember, so part of his reign includes the period 1099-1115.
Yes, but I also included El Cid who died in 1099 (Alexios in the historical figure who precedes him in the timeline). So would need someone else to cover that gap.
 

MAGolding

Ad Honorem
Aug 2015
2,933
Chalfont, Pennsylvania
Yes, but I also included El Cid who died in 1099 (Alexios in the historical figure who precedes him in the timeline). So would need someone else to cover that gap.
So apparently you don't want to count the same person as the greatest leader twice, even though a list of, for example, the greatest leaders in Ireland might include Mael Sechnaill mac Domnail twice, once before Brian Boru and once again after Brian Boru.
 
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