Most famous battles in history

Most famous

  • Battle of Waterloo

    Votes: 13 37.1%
  • Battle of Stalingrad

    Votes: 9 25.7%
  • Battle of Hastings

    Votes: 1 2.9%
  • Battle of Somme

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Battle of Gettysburg

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Battle of Midway

    Votes: 1 2.9%
  • Battle of the Bulge

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Battle of Marathon

    Votes: 1 2.9%
  • Battle of Thermopylae

    Votes: 4 11.4%
  • Battle of Trafalgar

    Votes: 2 5.7%
  • Other

    Votes: 4 11.4%

  • Total voters
    35
Oct 2018
2,106
Sydney
It's interesting that no Roman battles made the poll. Some particularly notable ones would be Cannae (undoubtedly famous among those of a military persuasion), Zama, Alesia, Teutoberg Forest and the Milvian Bridge. Indeed, while I'm not a Christian myself, I would imagine that the Milvian Bridge had a particular resonance in the Christian world at large, although the absence of a well-known film on the topic is a hindrance.

Which Roman battles do people think to be particularly famous?
 

Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
6,557
Portugal
I wasn't aware of these battles. Do they occupy a prominent place in Portugese education, then?
Well… they aren’t that famous… but yes, they have some prominence in the Portuguese educational system. And Aljubarrota is also studied in Spain.

Aljubarrota was a decisive battle during the 1383-5 crisis, of the Portuguese against the Castilians (supported by many Portuguese, French and Aragonese). It allowed that the crowns of Portugal and Castile were kept apart… it is quite an interesting battle that should be more known, at least by the people that study late medieval military history. I recall I mentioned this battle here in a thread with the theme infantry vs cavalry:

Battle of Aljubarrota - Wikipedia

Ourique is mostly a myth, it is the foundation battle for Portugal, where D. Afonso Henriques defeated five Moor kings (from the Taifas, we don’t exactly know what kings from what Taifas… if they were really five) and was proclaimed as king of Portugal (the first Portuguese king). Probably his foes were an Almoravid army. But we don’t even know where the battle took place:

Battle of Ourique - Wikipedia
 

johnincornwall

Ad Honorem
Nov 2010
8,021
Cornwall
That was my first thought. There is a common saying in Portugal that all the families have a black sheep. In this list, it is clearly the Battle of the Bulge.

Anyway, I would vote for the Battle of Aljubarrota, or Ourique… I don’t even understand why they are not in the list! Clearly they need some movies!
As probably one of the few English people to have read about Aljubarrota it is an interesting one and I might agree with your Latino-style partisanism. It's a real interesting case of proper leadership over 'paper power' and the Castillian effort goes another step to proving my theory that most commanders in the medieval era had no idea what they were doing!

Ourique? No not having that :). Put in the context of a collapsing Almoravid authority - trouble aplenty in Morocco - if you read through the fantastical legend it's just against a few garrison troops and militia from individual towns, surely? It was an era of religious fervour over facts for sure
 

Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
6,557
Portugal
As probably one of the few English people to have read about Aljubarrota it is an interesting one and I might agree with your Latino-style partisanism. It's a real interesting case of proper leadership over 'paper power' and the Castillian effort goes another step to proving my theory that most commanders in the medieval era had no idea what they were doing!

Ourique? No not having that . Put in the context of a collapsing Almoravid authority - trouble aplenty in Morocco - if you read through the fantastical legend it's just against a few garrison troops and militia from individual towns, surely? It was an era of religious fervour over facts for sure
Well… my partisanism was a half-joke.

And I mostly agree on you, on both battles. About Aljubarrota, it seems that D. Juan I had no intention to attack the way the Castilians attacked. It was the younger knights that against orders launched it, and the king, with fevers, decided that since they were already attacking…

About Ourique… probably we will never know what happened… we have few sources and most are filled with religious mysticism, constructed even more during all these centuries.

And they are winning the pool!

“You win again”! Oh… that one was from the Bee Gees!
 

johnincornwall

Ad Honorem
Nov 2010
8,021
Cornwall
And I mostly agree on you, on both battles. About Aljubarrota, it seems that D. Juan I had no intention to attack the way the Castilians attacked. It was the younger knights that against orders launched it, and the king, with fevers, decided that since they were already attacking…
This above all was the era when you did that (11th/12th/13th centuries) - you charged at the other side with a heavy cavalry charge, otherwise you were a coward! There's a long list of catastropes down to that and not just in Iberia - Hattin is probably the classic.

Anyone with any wit would beat it every time
 
Nov 2016
1,619
Germany
The poll is very Eurocentric.
True, but Waterloo was not without relevance even to China:

(South China Morning Post)

It is the evening of June 18, 1815 and an exultant Napoleon Bonaparte surveys the field after winning the Battle of Waterloo, planning his next conquest.

Within years his empire will stretch as far as China, French will be spoken across the continent (...)

(...)

But if one imagines that Bonaparte had eventually defeated his European enemies in the long-term, his ambitions afterwards would have been demonstrably larger, historians said.

"If Napoleon followed his original plans for 1810, he would have invaded Russia again and potentially extended his empire as far as China," da Luz said.

(...)

An even more radical scenario was put forward in the 19th century by the French writer Louis Geoffroy. In his novel Napoleon and the Conquest of the World, 1812-1832, he described how Napoleon was able to overrun China, turning it into a mere "Asian province".
 
May 2018
163
On earth.
I think among more military history interested people, the battle of Waterloo is more famous. Napoleon's last battle, etc. But I'll be honest and say that before I got into history, I had little idea what this battle actually was. Thermopolae is much more known among common-folk - and if not the name of the battle itself, then certainly the 300 spartans.