Most famous battles in history

Most famous

  • Battle of Waterloo

    Votes: 12 41.4%
  • Battle of Stalingrad

    Votes: 7 24.1%
  • Battle of Hastings

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Battle of Somme

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Battle of Gettysburg

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Battle of Midway

    Votes: 1 3.4%
  • Battle of the Bulge

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Battle of Marathon

    Votes: 1 3.4%
  • Battle of Thermopylae

    Votes: 4 13.8%
  • Battle of Trafalgar

    Votes: 1 3.4%
  • Other

    Votes: 3 10.3%

  • Total voters
    29
Oct 2018
2,080
Sydney
In the UK, I think it would fairly close between Waterloo, Hastings, Somme, Trafalgar and Agincourt (notably absent on the poll IMO). It would be hard to pick one above the others as I'd expect anyone who has the vaguest hint of historical education to have heard of all 4. Of course recent polls have shown that something like 1/4 of the population has never heard of Churchill, so....
Yeah, actually, I'm amazed no-one has mentioned Agincourt until this point.
 
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Oct 2018
2,080
Sydney
I guess so. There may even be medieval battles that are more important to them. Most of my Russian knowledge is squarely Napoleonic I’m afraid.
Lake Peipus, Poltava and Stalingrad seem like the defining Russia-defeats-invader battles. The Napoleonic Wars isn't my thing, but while I'm sure the 1812 campaign as a whole holds a similar place in the Russian collective memory (thus e.g. the 1812 Overture), I wonder how Borodino fits into that picture, since it was a tactical French victory. What are your thoughts on that?

I mentioned Kulikovo because it was the first Muscovite victory over the Mongol overlords. The Great Stand at the Ugra River in 1480 is the campaign that actually threw off their vassalage 100 years later, but I wonder whether Kulikovo has a greater fame for being an actual victory in the field and the first of its kind. After all, Dmitry Donskoy, like Alexander Nevsky, is a saint.

It's be good to hear from @Gvelion.
 
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Larrey

Ad Honorem
Sep 2011
6,097
I agree with Lake Peipus. After all, there was that Russian poll in 2008 on the greatest Russian in history, and the winner was Alexander Nevsky.
That's ironic, considering all available information about it make little to no sense and has all the hallmarks of being made up. Nevsky won something seems to be the only reasonably solid conclusions anyone can really draw. Who was "Spiridon"?
 

Maki

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
3,964
Republika Srpska
Sorry! Me jumping to conclusions then. :)
However, you are right that we do not know who this Spiridon is. He is mentioned as a leader of the Swedes:
"And there was a great slaughter of Svei. Their Voyevoda, by name Spiridon, was killed,"
Yet the name Spiridon does not sound Swedish and the only Spiridon mentioned besides this one is Spiridon, the Archbishop of Novgorod.
 
Oct 2018
2,080
Sydney
However, you are right that we do not know who this Spiridon is. He is mentioned as a leader of the Swedes:
"And there was a great slaughter of Svei. Their Voyevoda, by name Spiridon, was killed,"
Yet the name Spiridon does not sound Swedish and the only Spiridon mentioned besides this one is Spiridon, the Archbishop of Novgorod.
What is the source that you're quoting?
 

At Each Kilometer

Ad Honorem
Sep 2012
4,127
Bulgaria
Spiridon is the name of the archbishop of Novgorod mentioned in the main source of the battle 'Life of Aleksandr Nevskii' and with his blessing Alexsandr sets out with a small force and manages to surprise the Swedes. EDIT: A Swedish voevoda with the same name Spiridon was killed together with a bishop. Corpses of fallen Swedes, found on the bank, where Novgorodian army had not been able to penetrate, are thought to have been killed by God's angels. Corpses of high ranking Swedes, placed on three ships, were sunk, the rest buried in holes. The only source to name the leader of the Swedish army is the apocryphal 'Testament of the Swedish King Magnus' - 'First Kniaz' Berger set out and entered the Neva, and Kniaz' Aleksandr met him on the river Izhora, drove himself away and defeated the army'. Though in 1240 Ulf Fase, not Birger Magnusson, was the Jarl of Sweden.
 
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