Most inbred royalty?

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
18,745
SoCal
#33
Thanks!

BTW, I have a somewhat off-topic question: Had Louis XV died in 1728 or earlier, do you think that there could have been a War of the French Succession between supporters of Philip V of Spain (who might try to renounce the Spanish throne in exchange for acquiring the French throne in this scenario) and supporters of the Duke of Orleans?
 
Feb 2019
598
Pennsylvania, US
#36
Your sentence here doesn't even make sense. It's as if you became dazed and confused by what I wrote here! ;)
Pretty much...

Basically you have three tiers of expressions of the slang phrase "can't even." ...

Tier 1 is "I can't even...";
Tier 2 is "I cannot even..."
and tier 3, which is the most bourgeoisie version is "I do not currently possess the ability to can (even)..."

It makes no sense... but that's why it is funny.
 
Likes: Futurist

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
18,745
SoCal
#37
Pretty much...

Basically you have three tiers of expressions of the slang phrase "can't even." ...

Tier 1 is "I can't even...";
Tier 2 is "I cannot even..."
and tier 3, which is the most bourgeoisie version is "I do not currently possess the ability to can (even)..."

It makes no sense... but that's why it is funny.
Thanks for the explanation! :)
 

VHS

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
4,426
Florania
#38
Of course not. If he could get an heir everything would continue normally and his heir would inherit all of Spain. It was evident that he was full of problems and disabilities from the moment he was born and it was pretty obvious he was probably infertile. They made partition plans to exploit the weak situation he was in and peacefully resolve the succession crisis, which obviously did not work.
Why was he placed on the throne in the first place?
From what I read on Wikipedia, another son of Philip IV might also suffer from the consequences of inbreeding.
Philip Prospero, Prince of Asturias - Wikipedia
Of all the children of Philip IV, only this is a "normal" boy:
Balthasar Charles, Prince of Asturias - Wikipedia
I prefer going scientific here: the high child mortality rate in the Spanish family was partially inbreeding and partially poor medical
science of the day.
 
Feb 2019
618
Serbia
#39
Why was he placed on the throne in the first place?
From what I read on Wikipedia, another son of Philip IV might also suffer from the consequences of inbreeding.
Philip Prospero, Prince of Asturias - Wikipedia
Of all the children of Philip IV, only this is a "normal" boy:
Balthasar Charles, Prince of Asturias - Wikipedia
I prefer going scientific here: the high child mortality rate in the Spanish family was partially inbreeding and partially poor medical
science of the day.
I know, how does this relate to the discussion? I was arguing about the marriage to France giving the French a claim, I was not disputing inbreeding or the disorders it brought to the Habsburgs.
 
Feb 2019
598
Pennsylvania, US
#40
Why was he placed on the throne in the first place?
That's a very good question... his mother was Queen Regent - from what I gather, up to her death, when Charles was 35. Perhaps they held out hope that his developmental delays would resolve as he aged?

You raise a good point - perhaps the medicine of the day was partially to blame for some of these fertility issues / infant mortalities.
 

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