Most Interesting Ancient Seafaring Group?

Most Interesting Ancient Seafarers?

  • Phoenicians

    Votes: 32 49.2%
  • Greeks

    Votes: 11 16.9%
  • Romans

    Votes: 2 3.1%
  • Other

    Votes: 20 30.8%

  • Total voters
    65

sparky

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
3,827
Sydney
#52
.
Ancient Indian traders have a strong connection with the Early Khmer Javanese and Balinese culture



Malays certainly deserve a mention , heroic pirates and intrepid pillagers they traveled as far as Madagascar where they left their traces
 
Oct 2016
93
Ashland
#53
Polynesians and Norse get my vote.
Rather than 'Polynesians', I'd dub them 'Austronesians.'
They didn't exactly want to go exploring, but the islands would only support a limited number of inhabitants. Same as with the Norse : they literally had to draw lots as to who could go or stay(as in Gotland.)
Notice how, originating from Taiwan, the Austronesians lost first one part of their Cultural Package after another as they spread from the Philippines across the South and Central Pacific; such as , almost unbelievably, Rice Agriculture.
How did they miss Oz on their way to New Zealand? Was it like the Norse in Vinland because they ran into a powerful native populace there?
Also like the Norse(in Greenland) they experienced(on Easter Island or Rapa Nui) a cataclysmic cultural disaster about 1440 C.E.

***
The textbook, The Human Past, gives a detailed overview of the Austronesians.
 
Sep 2015
289
The Eastern Hinterlands
#54
The Phoenicians, no contest. They were to ancient times what the Portuguese were to the Age of Discovery. Those theories of the Phoenicians landing in America and Australia before everyone else are intriguing and tantalizing.
 
#55
Nice question but this is easy for me, in order .............

Sea Peoples

Vikings

Phoenicians

......... in fact, were there any others?

Greeks particularly Athens were known to sail as was Carthage, but other than that its hard to think of a nation or peoples dedicated to seafaring other than the ones mentioned.
 
Aug 2018
220
Italy
#56
Nice question but this is easy for me, in order .............

Sea Peoples

Vikings

Phoenicians

......... in fact, were there any others?

Greeks particularly Athens were known to sail as was Carthage, but other than that its hard to think of a nation or peoples dedicated to seafaring other than the ones mentioned.
Pretty much all the groups living in the ancient Mediterranean sailed, but the ones who were particularly dedicated to seafaring and had powerful fleets were:
The Minoans
Ugarit and the Syro-Palestinese city states, pretty much the precursors of the Phoenicians
Bronze age Cypriot/Alashiyans
Mycenaean Greeks
Euboean Greeks
Phocean Greeks
The Athenians
The Phoenicians
The Cilician pirates
The Illyrians
The Etruscans

These ones which I've listed above are the ones whose economies relied heavily on long distance sea trade and seafaring, I don't know whether to include the Egyptians among the thalassocracies since while they did have very advanced ships for their time and sailed all the way down to the Horn of Africa, and had control of the Palestinese ports during the late bronze age, I wouldn't say they were really that bent on exploring and opening up new markets. The Vikings aren't ancient, but the bronze age Scandinavians frequently painted boats and canoes so it seems that the precursors of the Vikings were already very interested in seafaring.

Some other groups who sailed in ancient times were the:
Armoric Veneti, a celtic tribe
Adriatic Veneti
Sardinians
Lycians
Ligurians
Picenti
Numidians
Mauri
The Sumerians and the Akkadians.
The inhabitants of the Indus Valley civilization.
The Han chinese who obviously had remarkable fleets, but I didn't include them in the thalassocracies since I was thinking about the Mediterranean.
 
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#57
Pretty much all the groups living in the ancient Mediterranean sailed, but the ones who were particularly dedicated to seafaring and had powerful fleets were:
The Minoans
Ugarit and the Syro-Palestinese city states, pretty much the precursors of the Phoenicians
Bronze age Cypriot/Alashiyans
Mycenaean Greeks
Euboean Greeks
Phocean Greeks
The Athenians
The Phoenicians
The Cilician pirates
The Illyrians
The Etruscans

These ones which I've listed above are the ones whose economies relied heavily on long distance sea trade and seafaring, I don't know whether to include the Egyptians among the thalassocracies since while they did have very advanced ships for their time and sailed all the way down to the Horn of Africa, and had control of the Palestinese ports during the late bronze age, I wouldn't say they were really that bent on exploring and opening up new markets. The Vikings aren't ancient, but the bronze age Scandinavians frequently painted boats and canoes so it seems that the precursors of the Vikings were already very interested in seafaring.

Some other groups who sailed in ancient times were the:
Armoric Veneti, a celtic tribe
Adriatic Veneti
Sardinians
Lycians
Ligurians
Picenti
Numidians
Mauri
The Sumerians and the Akkadians.
The inhabitants of the Indus Valley civilization.
The Han chinese who obviously had remarkable fleets, but I didn't include them in the thalassocracies since I was thinking about the Mediterranean.
Good list but I need to pull you up on "The Sumerians and the Akkadians"

Errhh they were not seafaring, they didn't even have a coast line, they were basically land locked in Mesopotamia except for the southern tip of Iraq leading into the Persian Gulf and that was only close to the Sumerians however Sumer was still in land not coastal except for Ur, Akkad was even further north right in the centre of Mesopotamia.
The Sumerians and the Akkadians were purely City State peoples.

Unless you know something I don't? and I have quite extensive knowledge of these two peoples.

I'm not saying they never stepped in a boat, I'm saying they don't qualify as seafaring peoples.
 
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Aug 2018
220
Italy
#58
Good list but I need to pull you up on "The Sumerians and the Akkadians"

Errhh they were not seafaring, they didn't even have a coast line, they were basically land locked in Mesopotamia except for the southern tip of Iraq leading into the Persian Gulf and that was only close to the Sumerians however their Sumer was still in land not coastal, Akkad was even further north right in the centre of Mesopotamia.
The Sumerians and the Akkadians were purely City State peoples.

Unless you know something I don't? and I have quite extensive knowledge of these two peoples.
Sumerians and Akkadians were indeed seafaring, they had sails (which are depicted in mesopotamian art since the Ubaid period) and regularly traded with kingdoms in the Persian gulf, see for example Dilmun
 
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Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
4,878
Portugal
#59
Those theories of the Phoenicians landing in America and Australia before everyone else are intriguing and tantalizing.
Although those ideas came up, and many forgeries, I wouldn’t call it “theories”. Even so the Phoenicians are also among my favourite seafaring peoples.

Nice question but this is easy for me, in order .............

Sea Peoples

Vikings

Phoenicians

......... in fact, were there any others?

Greeks particularly Athens were known to sail as was Carthage, but other than that its hard to think of a nation or peoples dedicated to seafaring other than the ones mentioned.
The Greeks, and not only the Athenians, quite early established themselves all over the coasts of the Mediterranean and arrived to the Atlantic, so don’t see why they cannot be considered a seafaring people for the period. The example of Pytheas of Massalia is paradigmatic.

Sumerians and Akkadians were indeed seafaring, they had sails (which are depicted in mesopotamian art since the Ubaid period) and regularly traded with kingdoms in the Persian gulf, see for example Dilmun
But, Massenzio, I have the idea that we really don’t know much about Dilmun, besides the results of relatively recent archaeological campaigns and some rare mentions in Sumerian texts. But I confess that my knowledge about it is mostly inexistent.
 

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