Most interesting theater in World War II

Most interesting theater of WW2?

  • Asia/Pacific

    Votes: 15 34.1%
  • Europe

    Votes: 24 54.5%
  • Africa

    Votes: 2 4.5%
  • Other

    Votes: 3 6.8%

  • Total voters
    44

stevev

Ad Honorem
Apr 2017
3,174
Las Vegas, NV USA
#14
The Iberian Theater. Yes I know this wasn't a theater of war. That's why it's so interesting. In Lisbon German and British officers in uniform walked on the same streets and often ate in the same restaurants. I understand servers carried notes between the British and German tables. I wonder what they said.
 
May 2019
76
Earth
#15
The Iberian Theater. Yes I know this wasn't a theater of war. That's why it's so interesting. In Lisbon German and British officers in uniform walked on the same streets and often ate in the same restaurants. I understand servers carried notes between the British and German tables. I wonder what they said.
Macau was a similar hot spot for intrigue, due to it being a neutral Portuguese colony that the Japanese never took over. Pro-Allied and Pro-Axis agents constantly running behind each other's backs, and consuls working overtime trying to pick up intel to send to the home govt.
 
Feb 2019
609
Serbia
#16
For me, the European theatre (Eastern Front and the Mediterranean.) with North Africa coming in second. I like the Eastern Front because of the sheer scale of it. It was larger and arguably more complex than anything ever seen before. The other 2 are due to the heavy British involvement in them.
 
Likes: Futurist

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
18,734
SoCal
#17
Europe due to the greater intensity of the war there. The outcome of the war with Japan was never in doubt but I've previously heard that the USSR might have been on the verge of collapse in 1941-1942 and that only Lend-Lease and the liberation of Ukraine might have saved them.
 
May 2011
13,908
Navan, Ireland
#18
Very good choice read this

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fascinating stuff, SAS based themselves upon them.

Even better one thing I loved was their most effective tactic wasn't driving around shooting everything up but just to infiltrate, sit silently and count everything passing.
 
May 2011
13,908
Navan, Ireland
#19
I can not honestly answer because I find all theatres fascinating, I have at times loved reading about Arnhem or D-Day or as a young man the Eastern Front. Naval war especially the Battle of the Atlantic is great and how could you not find Dunkirk/Battle of Britain not intriguing?

But at the moment I am fascinated by Burma and a bit by the Aussies in New Guinea including the fate of the POW's. Not sure why perhaps because unlike Europe where it became increasingly massive and mechanised in battles like Kohima individual battalions and even soldiers made a difference and fighting was still deeply personnel -- a Welsh conscript holding a vital fox hole with just his shovel --Freddy Spencer Chapman operating for years behind Japanese lines in Malaya.

Perhaps it was that the environment was as much a hindrance as the enemy, perhaps it was the development of the British whom the Japanese totally out soldiered in Malaya to perhaps the reverse by the end. And the no holds bared nature of the fighting-- the British learnt to fight in the jungle but for instance with the Chindts wounded were often left to their own devices-- sat on a track a bag of food and a weapon, suicide or fight it out. Recently read of one young officer shot in both legs left as such decide either he was not going to die or would at least die trying-- he crawled to Burma!

So many great stories but you can say that of every theatre.
 
Likes: Futurist

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