Most Lopsided Victories In History

Aug 2018
341
london
#24
Battle of the Teutoburg Forest.

The Battle of the Teutoburg Forest (German: Schlacht im Teutoburger Wald, Hermannsschlacht, or Varusschlacht, Italian: Disfatta di Varo), described as the Varian Disaster (Clades Variana) by Roman historians, took place in the Teutoburg Forest in 9 CE, when an alliance of Germanic tribes ambushed and decisively destroyed three Roman legions and their auxiliaries, led by Publius Quinctilius Varus. The alliance was led by Arminius, a Germanic officer of Varus' auxilia. Arminius had acquired Roman citizenship and had received a Roman military education, which enabled him to deceive the Roman commander methodically and anticipate the Roman army's tactical responses.

Despite several successful campaigns and raids by the Romans in the years after the battle, they never again attempted to conquer the Germanic territories east of the Rhine river. The victory of the Germanic tribes against Rome's legions in the Teutoburg Forest would have far-reaching effects on the subsequent history of both the ancient Germanic peoples and the Roman Empire. Contemporary and modern historians have generally regarded Arminius' victory over Varus as "Rome's greatest defeat",[4] one of the most decisive battles recorded in military history,[5][6][7][8][9] and as "a turning-point in world history".[10]

Battle of the Teutoburg Forest - Wikipedia
 
Nov 2010
7,158
Cornwall
#26
Battle of the Teutoburg Forest.

The Battle of the Teutoburg Forest (German: Schlacht im Teutoburger Wald, Hermannsschlacht, or Varusschlacht, Italian: Disfatta di Varo), described as the Varian Disaster (Clades Variana) by Roman historians, took place in the Teutoburg Forest in 9 CE, when an alliance of Germanic tribes ambushed and decisively destroyed three Roman legions and their auxiliaries, led by Publius Quinctilius Varus. The alliance was led by Arminius, a Germanic officer of Varus' auxilia. Arminius had acquired Roman citizenship and had received a Roman military education, which enabled him to deceive the Roman commander methodically and anticipate the Roman army's tactical responses.

Despite several successful campaigns and raids by the Romans in the years after the battle, they never again attempted to conquer the Germanic territories east of the Rhine river. The victory of the Germanic tribes against Rome's legions in the Teutoburg Forest would have far-reaching effects on the subsequent history of both the ancient Germanic peoples and the Roman Empire. Contemporary and modern historians have generally regarded Arminius' victory over Varus as "Rome's greatest defeat",[4] one of the most decisive battles recorded in military history,[5][6][7][8][9] and as "a turning-point in world history".[10]

Battle of the Teutoburg Forest - Wikipedia
Currently reading an analysis of Charlemagne's defeat in the Pyrenees at what became known (much) later as Roncesvalles (Roland and all that business). When I've finished the book I might post a thread on it.

Anyway it really reminds me of Teutoberg Forest. I'd never read so deeply on it before, but analysisng the landscape, the inevitable forest, ravines and narrow tracks where iit possibly happened, the parallels are very striking. It certainly falls into the OP category

https://www.amazon.co.uk/derrota-Carlomagno-investigaciĆ³n-Batalla-Roncesvalles/dp/8476817819


There are many battles like that in history.
Yes indeed!
 

Poly

Ad Honorem
Apr 2011
6,669
Georgia, USA
#28
Anglo-Zanzibar War has to be the most one sided battle/war ever.

Battle of Omdurman 1898
48 British dead, 12,000 Sudanese dead

Battle of Plassey 1757
730 British soldiers V 52,000 Indian soldiers
 
Feb 2018
157
US
#29
The most lopsided victories are going to be from the colonial wars where the Europeans had an enormous, outsider edge in technology and martial skill.

Baldwin IV of Jerusalem crushed Saladin's hitherto invincible army at Montgisard in 1177, despite being outnumbered 5,000 to somewhere in the 20,000's. He did this by clever maneuvering and luring Saladin's army into a battlefield covered by hydrophilic flora and cross-cut by streams, making it difficult to maneuver a large army. Saladin's army was unable to properly deploy on the battlefield and in the ensuing rout lost 90% of his forces. Baldwin was 16 years old and aflicted by leprosy, which makes it all the more remarkable.
 
Nov 2010
7,158
Cornwall
#30
The most lopsided victories are going to be from the colonial wars where the Europeans had an enormous, outsider edge in technology and martial skill.

Baldwin IV of Jerusalem crushed Saladin's hitherto invincible army at Montgisard in 1177, despite being outnumbered 5,000 to somewhere in the 20,000's. He did this by clever maneuvering and luring Saladin's army into a battlefield covered by hydrophilic flora and cross-cut by streams, making it difficult to maneuver a large army. Saladin's army was unable to properly deploy on the battlefield and in the ensuing rout lost 90% of his forces. Baldwin was 16 years old and aflicted by leprosy, which makes it all the more remarkable.

As in the other thread numbers sometimes don't mean all that much. I do know that in Saladin's last effort (before the Christian-catastrophic Hattin campaign) he had to retreat as the crusaders stayed behind the walls of Jerusalem until much of his army had to go home to sort the crops (according to Maalouf). Sort of suggests to me that Baldwin's army above would be largely heavily armed professional knights or horse soldiers including the Military Orders, the 20,000 opponents largely gathered up for the job
 

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