Most successful Sicilian General/Admiral/Warrior?

Willempie

Ad Honorem
Jul 2015
5,722
Netherlands
Technically ... he was King of Sicily, but Italians, Sicilians included, tend to think to him more as a German.
I don't know how the Sicilians viewed him. But he spend almost all his life in Sicily, whenever he was not at war or holding diets.
 
Nov 2016
1,605
Germany
But he spend almost all his life in Sicily, whenever he was not at war or holding diets.
In Germany he is clearly considered a German, though he grew up in Italy and spoke Arabic better than German and Italian. He descended from the German Staufer house in Swabia.

(11th century)
1577999722547.png

(13th century)
1578000008528.png
 
Last edited:

Willempie

Ad Honorem
Jul 2015
5,722
Netherlands
In Germany he is clearly considered a German, though he grew up in Italy and spoke Arabic better than German and Italian.
Somehow these discussions always remind me of the story of the Austrian ambassador to the UN: I think I have done an excellent job. I have convinced the world that Mozart was Austrian and Hitler a German.

Since I am not Sicilian I can't really say how they would view him. I personally think he isn't any less Sicilian than Bohemund.
 
Apr 2018
338
Italy
Technically ... he was King of Sicily, but Italians, Sicilians included, tend to think to him more as a German.
He was born in Jesi, spent his youth and most of his life in Sicily and is buried in Palermo. I doubt he can be considered German.
 

AlpinLuke

Forum Staff
Oct 2011
27,609
Italy, Lago Maggiore
I don't know how the Sicilians viewed him. But he spend almost all his life in Sicily, whenever he was not at war or holding diets.
Historically Italians have "adopted" foreign Lords [German, French, Spanish ...] and in that moment there was no real "Italian" identity around. Frederich was Sicilian like the French Kings were and like the Spanish nobles would have later been. To say all Sicily still see a well alive nationalist movement, not as Sardinia, but still relevant.