Murder/ execution of the Romanovs

Oct 2018
1,209
Adelaide south Australia
Don't know if this topic has been dealt with before. I raise it because I'm interested in the opinions of others.

16-17 July 1918, Czar Nicholas 11, his wife Tsarina Alexandra, their 5 children, and several courtiers were shot, clubbed and bayonetted in what was apparently an especially nasty, botched execution.

My question is was it politically necessary to kill them ?

A perhaps simplistic answer is "Yes, Of course it was necessary, to remove legitimate Romanov claimants the the throne and remove figureheads for a White's counter revolution"

BUT; there had been White Russian opposition from the beginning of the Revolution. Did they ever have a realistic chance of defeating the Bolsheviks and restoring the Czar?

It is my understanding that several, more distantly related members of the Romanov family escaped from Russia to Europe and England. The established rules of royal succession would have applied, surely not that hard to find an acceptable pretender?

I do not argue the escape of any the executed Romanovs because ,as far as I'm aware, all have now been accounted for through DNA tests of skeletal remains

I did read a bit ,and saw a TV series of the sad story of Anna Anderson, who claimed to be the Grand Duchess Anastasia. .She seems to have been the most plausible contender, even though it became clear that she had been extensively coached and did not speak or understand Russian.
 

rvsakhadeo

Ad Honorem
Sep 2012
9,224
India
As far as I know, the ' Whites ' had no chance to succeed in their counter--revolution. The Bolsheviks had to get rid of the Romanovs if at all they wanted to rule without any resistance. Like the French Revolution, the Royal family had to be killed. This was the necessity for the success and the completion of the revolution
 
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rvsakhadeo

Ad Honorem
Sep 2012
9,224
India
As far as I know, the ' Whites ' had no chance to succeed in their counter--revolution. The Bolsheviks had to get rid of the Romanovs if at all they wanted to rule without any resistance. Like the French Revolution, the Royal family had to be killed. This was the necessity for the success and the completion of the revolution.
 

sparky

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
5,363
Sydney
Admiral Kolchak was advancing on Yekaterinburg
on 17 July 1918 , the czar and his family were executed by the Bolshevik Latvian rifles after receiving their orders from Moscow ,
the city was taken by the Whites on the 26 July .

it was logistics as much as anything else
 

Edratman

Forum Staff
Feb 2009
6,709
Eastern PA
As far as I know, the ' Whites ' had no chance to succeed in their counter--revolution. The Bolsheviks had to get rid of the Romanovs if at all they wanted to rule without any resistance. Like the French Revolution, the Royal family had to be killed. This was the necessity for the success and the completion of the revolution
I agree entirely.

In 1918, no one was certain that the White counter-revolution had little chance of success. The possible presence of the Royal family in the camps of the opposition had to be considered a serious threat to the future Bolshevik regime, which was quite tenuous at that moment.
 

Pendennis

Ad Honorem
Mar 2013
3,386
Kirkcaldy, Scotland
Despite being first cousins, there was a marked reluctance by the British royal family to welcome the Romanovs to Britain-although their murder made the issue redundant.
 
Oct 2018
1,209
Adelaide south Australia
Despite being first cousins, there was a marked reluctance by the British royal family to welcome the Romanovs to Britain-although their murder made the issue redundant.
I didn't know that. Why?

The common perception is that after the executions, Queen Mary Insisted on sending the Royal navy to rescue the remaining the Romanovs. That makes sense to me; she and hubby George V were apparently horrified at the executions and probably feeling very guilty for not rescuing them, especially the children.
 

Belgarion

Ad Honorem
Jul 2011
6,771
Australia
The execution can be seen as a knee jerk reaction to the possibility of the Romanovs being rescued by the approaching White forces. However it 's also possible that the decision to execute them had already been made and the possibility of rescue was merely a cover to give some feeble justification for the murders.
 
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Kevinmeath

Ad Honoris
May 2011
14,078
Navan, Ireland
As far as I know, the ' Whites ' had no chance to succeed in their counter--revolution. The Bolsheviks had to get rid of the Romanovs if at all they wanted to rule without any resistance. Like the French Revolution, the Royal family had to be killed. This was the necessity for the success and the completion of the revolution

There have been many Royal Houses deposed and they have not all seen the whole family slaughtered?

The Kaiser and his family was not killed and he did not lead a counter-revolution

On Indian independence were all the 'State' rulers and their families slaughtered by the new Republic?

And regarding the French revolution I think the execution of the King and the shameful abuse of the Dauphin was a mistake -- while they held the 'rightful' heir to the throne they controlled him, when he died the 'rightful king now lived abroad and able to ferment hostility.