Music and mythology

Jan 2019
22
Norway
#1
The conflict between Apollo and Marsyas always interested me a lot, because it explains a lot of things about musical preferences

Apollo goes infuriated that the mortals prefer to dance to Marsyas the Satyrs bone flute than listen to his technically superior lyre compositions, so he tied Marsyas's upside to a tree and skins him alive from the feet down.

People prefer ignorant primal music, but it's objectively inferior in a technical sense. Primal rhythmic music appeals to people on that very same primal level, making it more appealing to dance and move your body to, but it's objectively of a lower mental plane than actually composed music with intricate melodies and harmonies.
 
Feb 2019
17
Pennsylvania, US
#2
It's also interesting, that Apollo gave a golden lyre to Orpheus, and some of the descriptions of the impact his music had (charming beasts, calming waves, diverting rivers, causing trees and rocks to dance) are similar to those of the effect of Apollo's music during the contest with Marsyas... It's an interesting contrast: the manic, wild effect of Marsyas music, and the emotionally moving, calming, magical effect of Apollo's/Orpheus's.
 
Jan 2010
4,133
Atlanta, Georgia USA
#3
It's also interesting, that Apollo gave a golden lyre to Orpheus, and some of the descriptions of the impact his music had (charming beasts, calming waves, diverting rivers, causing trees and rocks to dance) are similar to those of the effect of Apollo's music during the contest with Marsyas... It's an interesting contrast: the manic, wild effect of Marsyas music, and the emotionally moving, calming, magical effect of Apollo's/Orpheus's.
But Orpheus was torn apart by a crowd of crazed women, no? Maybe close to today’s rock stars
 
Likes: Niobe
Feb 2019
17
Pennsylvania, US
#4
:lol::lol::lol:

Yes, well... you don't want to play too many ballads about your lost love when your fan base is predominantly female, and drunken "raving ones". People love you when you play them simple songs about love - but when you try to go deep / classical later in your career, watch out. Look at poor Paul McCartney.
 

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