Myanmar and Hungary leaders ''agree'' on ''Muslim population challenge''

Feb 2019
474
Serbia
#2
I see the post is edited.... Anyway, what is the question here? If this is intended to be a discussion on the morality or the purpose of the agreement I predict it will be more short-lived than the previous thread on such a matter.
 
Mar 2016
1,089
Australia
#3
No doubt this thread will get locked for "racism" or "discrimination" or something like that, so there's really no point starting a discussion on it, to be honest. Not on this site.
 
Likes: ksk
Feb 2019
474
Serbia
#4
No doubt this thread will get locked for "racism" or "discrimination" or something like that, so there's really no point starting a discussion on it, to be honest. Not on this site.
The problem is that the OP is meant to cause this kind of discussion and will turn political sooner or later. Considering that there are some people which I will not name that have very strong biases and will hardly accept a balanced discussion on a topic like this it is guaranteed that the thread will get derailed, it's almost like it's made to get closed.

For reference see the previous such thread: Austria bans Hijab from primary schools, Islamic intolerance on the rise in as extremists rise to power in Europe?
 

Linschoten

Ad Honoris
Aug 2010
16,044
Welsh Marches
#5
There aren't actually many Muslims in Hungary, are there? I'm afraid our Nobel peace prize winner has turned out to be something of a disappointment, she has in effect supported the military in its persecution of the Rohingya, evidently calculating that that is what her support base wants (and perhaps because she herself approves of it). Looking up the figures, I find that the Muslim population of Burma has grown from 3.9% in 1973 to 4.3% in 2014, while Muslims made up 0.057% of the Hungarian population 2011 census. Convincing evidence that 'growing Muslim populations' is the greatest challenge that their countries face! Who knows, the Muslim population of Hungary might reach 0.5% before too long! An unsavoury form of nationalism clearly lies behind this announcement.
 
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tomar

Ad Honoris
Jan 2011
13,226
#7
There aren't actually many Muslims in Hungary, are there? I'm afraid our Nobel peace prize winner has turned out to be something of a disappointment, she has in effect supported the military in its persecution of the Rohingya, evidently calculating that that is what her support base wants (and perhaps because she herself approves of it). Looking up the figures, I find that the Muslim population of Burma has grown from 3.9% in 1973 to 4.3% in 2014, while Muslims made up 0.057% of the Hungarian population 2011 census. Convincing evidence that 'growing Muslim populations' is the greatest challenge that their countries face! Who knows, the Muslim population of Hungary might reach 0.5% before too long! An unsavoury form of nationalism clearly lies behind this announcement.
To be faire, an article that starts with

Hungary’s far-right nationalist prime minister,

is not going to be objective .... The standards for "far right" are being lowered every day...... If Orban is far right, where are the nazis in the political spectrum ?

When you read the actual official statement, it turns out, surprise, surprise, that the independent is misrepresenting what was said (where are all those fake news fact checkers ?), at the very least in the title of the article


https://www.kormany.hu/en/the-prime...-state-counsellor-of-myanmar-aung-san-suu-kyi

At the meeting the two leaders highlighted that one of the greatest challenges at present for both countries and their respective regions – South East Asia and Europe – is migration. They noted that both regions have seen the emergence of the issue of coexistence with continuously growing Muslim populations.

Yes migration IS a problem... And yes there are coexistence issues.... .. And the "independent" twisting of what was actually said, to make a catchy title smacks of propaganda
 

Linschoten

Ad Honoris
Aug 2010
16,044
Welsh Marches
#8
Anything wrong with this agreement?
They "both see immigration and “continuously growing Muslim populations” as one of the greatest challenges facing their countries." I have already pointed out the Muslim population of Hungary amounts to about 0.05% and that the Muslim population of Burma is low (below 5%, and probably still lower after recent expulsions) and not growing at any speed. So that suggestion is plainly nonsensical. So why do they put it forward? This classic nationalist tactics to deflect attention from the real challenges by using small monirities of 'outsiders' as scapegoats. It is despicable, especially as coming from a Nobel Peace Prize Winner after the persecution of the Rohingyas - the suggestion is that is understandable thta they should have been treated in that way because of the challenge that they present to Burma.

P.S. See below, I would moderate this in view of the misrepresentation at the top of the article, it is better to look directly at the official statement linked above. But I am still rather shocked by the way in Aung San Suu Kyi has adopted a crude nationalist position on the Rohingya, and this statement does nothing whatever to mitigate my concern.
 
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Likes: Azad67

Linschoten

Ad Honoris
Aug 2010
16,044
Welsh Marches
#9
To be faire, an article that starts with

Hungary’s far-right nationalist prime minister,

is not going to be objective .... The standards for "far right" are being lowered every day...... If Orban is far right, where are the nazis in the political spectrum ?

When you read the actual official statement, it turns out, surprise, surprise, that the independent is misrepresenting what was said (where are all those fake news fact checkers ?), at the very least in the title of the article


https://www.kormany.hu/en/the-prime...-state-counsellor-of-myanmar-aung-san-suu-kyi

At the meeting the two leaders highlighted that one of the greatest challenges at present for both countries and their respective regions – South East Asia and Europe – is migration. They noted that both regions have seen the emergence of the issue of coexistence with continuously growing Muslim populations.

Yes migration IS a problem... And yes there are coexistence issues.... .. And the "independent" twisting of what was actually said, to make a catchy title smacks of propaganda
That's true actually, the summary does misrepresent the official statement; I might have looked at the report a bit more carefully if it had come from the Guardian (though the Independent sometimes can be as bad). Orban is routinely described as far right, one ceases to notice it.
 

kandal

Ad Honorem
Aug 2015
2,650
USA
#10
They "both see immigration and “continuously growing Muslim populations” as one of the greatest challenges facing their countries." I have already pointed out the Muslim population of Hungary amounts to about 0.05% and that the Muslim population of Burma is low (below 5%, and probably still lower after recent expulsions) and not growing at any speed. So that suggestion is plainly nonsensical. So why do they put it forward? This classic nationalist tactics to deflect attention from the real challenges by using small monirities of 'outsiders' as scapegoats. It is despicable, especially as coming from a Nobel Peace Prize Winner after the persecution of the Rohingyas - the suggestion is that is understandable thta they should have been treated in that way because of the challenge that they present to Burma.

P.S. See below, I would moderate this in view of the misrepresentation at the top of the article, it is better to look directly at the official statement linked above. But I am still rather shocked by the way in Aung San Suu Kyi has adopted a crude nationalist position on the Rohingya, and this statement does nothing whatever to mitigate my concern.
Hungary and Myanmar are not immigrant based countries like USA. They want to retain their character and progress. Its leaders are concerned about the safety, security and welfare of the people. They believe that illegal migrants pose a threat. Most countries are like that. It doesn't have anything to do with nationalism.
 

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