Names that appear in more than one language

Oct 2016
884
Merryland
#21
'Seneca' is a Native America nation
also a Roman senator.

(off topic--interesting that at the beginning of WWI the Brits had a general named French and the Germans had a von Francois)
 
Jan 2019
17
US
#22
The western name Remi (derived from the Latin remus, meaning branch) is also a name in Arabic and, I think, a North African language (although the spellings differ). On a somewhat related note, my Italian last name happens to be a word for "rubbish" in Japanese. Not a pleasant discovery.

If you find this topic interesting, you might like false cognates, if you haven't already read about them. Some nouns and verbs are common between unrelated languages not just phonetically but in meaning, as well. Like so, which means "I understand" in both Italian and Japanese. I believe that the Italian word is derived from cognosco, but I don't know anything about Japanese roots.
 

Naomasa298

Forum Staff
Apr 2010
31,335
T'Republic of Yorkshire
#23
If you find this topic interesting, you might like false cognates, if you haven't already read about them. Some nouns and verbs are common between unrelated languages not just phonetically but in meaning, as well. Like so, which means "I understand" in both Italian and Japanese. I believe that the Italian word is derived from cognosco, but I don't know anything about Japanese roots.
Hmm, I would say that "so(u)" means "That is correct" when used on its own or with "desu" in Japanese. As a piece of trivia, I don't believe there is any sentence in Japanese that cannot be responded to with 2so" or a variant thereof.
 
Jan 2019
17
US
#24
@Naomasa298
Ah, my mistake. I picked up that "so" translation informally from watching anime. English dubs with Japanese subs always simply wrote so when characters said "I understand." And English subs always translated so to "I understand" when spoken alone. Probably not the best way to pick up bits of a language.
 
May 2018
3
Arabia
#25
I would say Nouri, In arabic “my light”. And it’s also a korean\japanesse name.

The interesting name is Mai\May\Mei. In arabic it means the baby gazelle\baby ape. It also could be found in Chinses\Japanese, and most of the european languages, such as Danish, German and some of Norwegian languages.
 

Tulun

Ad Honorem
Nov 2010
3,637
Western Eurasia
#28
As far as I know, Idris is a distroeted greek name. It’s Andreas.

Aside: why the most posts have Arabic names? D:
There seems to be no consensus about the origin of the name Idris. Though it is traditionally identified with the biblical Enokh, there are different proposals for the origin of the name itself: suggested to be derived from the Arabic درس root (this seems to be the most common theory?), from Andreas, Esdras (Ezra), Theodoros, a South Arabian source, Poimandres... maybe even more theories exist :rolleyes:

anyway, another Arabic name to the list, Arabic Malik = king and Maalik = owner vs a common Czech and Slovak family name, Malik (this from Slavic mali "little"+patronymic suffix) :)
 

AlpinLuke

Ad Honoris
Oct 2011
24,685
Lago Maggiore, Italy
#29
A particular case: because of mysterious reasons [actually they are not so mysterious, I'm going to explain this] the Japanese name "Kaori" has become Italian. There are Italian parents calling their little daughter Kaori.

The explanation is simple: the TV advertising of a fantastic Italian cheese. There was a nice Japanese girl called Kaori. Now in Italy there are Italian girls called Kaori ... [power of TV!].
 

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