Native Americans - bloodthirsty savages or peaceful tribes?

VHS

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
3,906
Orion Arm
#51
The Yucatan and Southwest desert are two examples of habitats being destroyed by Native American groups. On the other hand the New England Native Americans were able to modify the surrounding woods to be a much easier place to hunt and gather food in. They burned the undergrowth every Fall. The ash fertilized the trees and a Hunter could see much further.



The Anasazi cut down the local Pinon Pines to build their dwellings. The

trees were holding the soil in place and the trees themselves were creating a bit of rain by recycling moisture. With the trees gone, they had go further and further for roof posts. The soil washed away. The climate went into drought.



The Maya went into a semiarid land that had a limited supply of water that was mostly underground. They built up a society that crashed and evaporated. On the west coast of Guatemala, there was no problems with drought. The mountains create a rain shield.


Pruitt
These were different between cultures as well?
Should we take these lessons as cautionary tales?
Many people still put developments before environments!
 

Tairusiano

Ad Honorem
Jun 2012
2,913
Brazil
#52
The Maya went into a semiarid land that had a limited supply of water that was mostly underground. They built up a society that crashed and evaporated. On the west coast of Guatemala, there was no problems with drought. The mountains create a rain shield.


Pruitt
Maya Yucatan cities existed until the arrival of Spanish conquerors Chichen Itza, Mayapan city and the league it formed dominated yucatan until 1450, the so-called collapse happened to the cities of the Peten basin, in Guatemala and Mexico Campeche state, and it is debatable if what happened, was the result of climate change made by humans, or a much more complex sun of factors, one example the cities warring wars for hegemony, social transformation, economic collapse and others.
 
Jun 2017
13
Norway
#53
If you haven't read it already "Hanta Yo" credited to Ruth Bebe Hill is a good starter on Dakotah ( or Lakotah) native Americans. I say credited rather than written because it was written in English in collaboration with some member of the Dakotahs ( I refuse to use the French term "Sioux") then translated into Dakotah before retranslating back into English but keeping the Native American idiom. It tells the whole story of life in a sub tribal unit rather than just one aspect. It's explained in the foreword.
 

Robert165

Ad Honorem
Jan 2010
4,265
North Georgia
#54
If you haven't read it already "Hanta Yo" credited to Ruth Bebe Hill is a good starter on Dakotah ( or Lakotah) native Americans. I say credited rather than written because it was written in English in collaboration with some member of the Dakotahs ( I refuse to use the French term "Sioux") then translated into Dakotah before retranslating back into English but keeping the Native American idiom. It tells the whole story of life in a sub tribal unit rather than just one aspect. It's explained in the foreword.
Hey, welcome to Historum :)

Why don't you like the term Sioux?
 

Edgewaters

Ad Honorem
Jul 2007
9,098
Canada
#55
The last free Mayan city, Tayasal - modern day Flores in Guatemala - fell in 1697, almost two centuries after the Spanish had captured the Aztec capital and seized northern Mexico.

Campaigning in the Yucatan was very difficult.
 
Sep 2012
879
Spring, Texas
#56
Hey, welcome to Historum :)

Why don't you like the term Sioux?

Siouxan is the name of a language group. The names of the tribe are actually Nacotah, Lacotah or Dacotah. All three fought at the Greasy Grass River (Little Bighorn). Other tribes gave them that name to French trappers. The larger Language group actually includes tribes like the Biloxi, Cheraw, Omaha, Osage and Catabaw.



Pruitt
 
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Robert165

Ad Honorem
Jan 2010
4,265
North Georgia
#57
Siouxan is the name of a language group. The names of the tribe are actually Nacotah, Lacotah or Dacotah. All three fought at the Greasy Grass River (Little Bighorn). Other tribes gave them that name to French trappers. The larger Language group actually includes tribes like the Biloxi, Cheraw, Omaha, Osage and Catabaw.



Pruitt
This article claims Sioux is a slang word for snake or little demon. I guess I see no reason to doubt the validity of the article. It seems the original word was snake (though not a Lakota or Dakota word) and came to mean demon/devil. The article is pretty interesting.
 

VHS

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
3,906
Orion Arm
#58
This article claims Sioux is a slang word for snake or little demon. I guess I see no reason to doubt the validity of the article. It seems the original word was snake (though not a Lakota or Dakota word) and came to mean demon/devil. The article is pretty interesting.
In the past, snakes may be insulting; then, this is one example of the priced, beautiful, rare banana ball python.
If some think ball pythons look like plush animals the way they are, there are plush versions......


 

Robert165

Ad Honorem
Jan 2010
4,265
North Georgia
#59
In the past, snakes may be insulting; then, this is one example of the priced, beautiful, rare banana ball python.
If some think ball pythons look like plush animals the way they are, there are plush versions......


Yes, i agree
But in the article I linked to there is a follow up article
and it talks about how the connection to snake and devil and christianity
and this is why it is a derogatory term to use snake

you can copy/paste the author of the article and put it in the search bar on that article page to find more article about this topic from the same author
 

VHS

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
3,906
Orion Arm
#60
Yes, i agree
But in the article I linked to there is a follow up article
and it talks about how the connection to snake and devil and christianity
and this is why it is a derogatory term to use snake

you can copy/paste the author of the article and put it in the search bar on that article page to find more article about this topic from the same author
This reminds me of Joni Mitchell's song Lakota.