Native construction of the Great Zimbabwe ?

Shtajerc

Ad Honorem
Jul 2014
6,310
Lower Styria, Slovenia
#11
They're large, free-standing ashlar stonework walls, with much of the bricks being ornately carved in some parts with designs mirroring those in Indonesia. Zimbabwe is also one, if the largest, out of hundreds of these stone buildings scattered throughout southeastern Africa that were the heart of much larger complexes.

Sure, they're not as elaborate as say, castles or brocs, but it's not so much what they are that's so famous about them. Rather, it's what they represent and show on what life was like in Southern Africa. It used to be common knowledge that everyone more or less lived in mud huts and cattle ranches, but instead we have these stone structures with evidence of trade as far away as Asia.
How many of such structures are there all over southern Africa? I know the Great Zimbabwe is the most known as it's one of the largest, thus called Great. Do they know who built them? Khoisan people before the Bantus moved down South?
 
Dec 2015
2,512
USA
#12
How many of such structures are there all over southern Africa? I know the Great Zimbabwe is the most known as it's one of the largest, thus called Great. Do they know who built them? Khoisan people before the Bantus moved down South?
I believe there are about 200-odd of them scattered throughout the region, and the Shona or the ancestors of the Shona are their primary builders. It wasn't the first kingdom in the area either: Mapungubwe existed a few centuries earlier and function along similar lines.
 
May 2015
42
Schertz ,Tx
#13
It's quite possible the natives did build them. there is probably plenty we don't know about the various tribes or peoples of Africa before the white man regardless of origin came. The eygptians had dealings with blacks in Nubia and maybe elsewhere are there are paintings and carvings of men captured during battles and brought to Egypt as slaves. There are also semetic peoples depicted as well. Only through some thorough research will we find answers.
 
May 2017
219
Italy
#14
They're large, free-standing ashlar stonework walls, with much of the bricks being ornately carved in some parts with designs mirroring those in Indonesia. Zimbabwe is also one, if the largest, out of hundreds of these stone buildings scattered throughout southeastern Africa that were the heart of much larger complexes.

Sure, they're not as elaborate as say, castles or brocs, but it's not so much what they are that's so famous about them. Rather, it's what they represent and show on what life was like in Southern Africa. It used to be common knowledge that everyone more or less lived in mud huts and cattle ranches, but instead we have these stone structures with evidence of trade as far away as Asia.
Hundreds?
I've only found like 10 more similar sites and they're all much smaller than the great enclosure, is there any reliable source that claims there were hundreds of these buildings?
 
Sep 2012
905
Prague, Czech Republic
#15
Hundreds?
I've only found like 10 more similar sites and they're all much smaller than the great enclosure, is there any reliable source that claims there were hundreds of these buildings?
Wikipedia says 200, and the reference goes to this article in Antiquity from 2008, which begins:

Great Zimbabwe is one of more than 200 sites in southern Africa which display the architectural tradition of those monumental but mortarless walls that have continued to attract archaeologists and the public alike.
The article in turn references GARLAKE, P.S. 1970. Rhodesian ruins: a preliminaryassessment of their styles and chronology. Journal of African History 11: 495-513.


That's online here, but you'd have to sign up for a Jstor account to see it.
 
May 2017
219
Italy
#16
Wikipedia says 200, and the reference goes to this article in Antiquity from 2008, which begins:


The article in turn references GARLAKE, P.S. 1970. Rhodesian ruins: a preliminaryassessment of their styles and chronology. Journal of African History 11: 495-513.


That's online here, but you'd have to sign up for a Jstor account to see it.
Thank you