Naval actions off Calais in 1810?

Mar 2019
282
Kansas
#2
Searching for a use of French 13 inch long range mortars. Was there any use of those in that year against the British blockading fleet?
I doubt the British would have ever stood in close enough to give the French a chance. If I recall correctly the main fort their was a mixture of 18 and 24 pounder guns which would easily out range any mortar available. A generally the squadrons did not come in very close. They would send smaller cutters and such inshore to see what the French were getting up to.

If you may not have seen it

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00ONZQ8Q8/ref=dp-kindle-redirect?_encoding=UTF8&btkr=1

Is an excellent book about the history of HMS Bellerophon, which spent two years in the channel fleet on blockade duty. Gives a very interesting insight into how the blockades were constructed and maintained.
 
Jun 2016
1,541
Oregon
#3
Thanks I ordered that as I loved James and other such books. My query came from a note I made about ten years ago

""Until this date mortars such as the long-range 13-inch ones employed by the French at the Siege of Calais in 1810, and the Liège Henri-Joseph Paixhans ‘Monster Mortar’ 24-inch {610 mm} mortars of 7-tons used at the siege of the Antwerp Citadel in 1832 22 were the largest ordnance around.""

Unfortunately the file is corrupted and the book from which I took this cannot be ascertained.
 
Mar 2019
282
Kansas
#4
Thanks I ordered that as I loved James and other such books. My query came from a note I made about ten years ago

""Until this date mortars such as the long-range 13-inch ones employed by the French at the Siege of Calais in 1810, and the Liège Henri-Joseph Paixhans ‘Monster Mortar’ 24-inch {610 mm} mortars of 7-tons used at the siege of the Antwerp Citadel in 1832 22 were the largest ordnance around.""

Unfortunately the file is corrupted and the book from which I took this cannot be ascertained.
I really dont know either way :( I have never heard of mortars ever being used against ships underway. I know the fall of shot for mortars in that era was horribly slow to the point defenders had time to get out of the way before the round hit them.
 
Jun 2016
1,541
Oregon
#5
I really dont know either way :( I have never heard of mortars ever being used against ships underway. I know the fall of shot for mortars in that era was horribly slow to the point defenders had time to get out of the way before the round hit them.
It certainly sounds unlikely I use to teach ballistic gunnery so hitting a moving ship with a smooth bore mortars would have been - difficult - despite a Hornblower story on it (or was what someone different?) - I must have copied the date wrong and it refers to something else. In 1810 Calais the only possible exchanges was a cutting out op or coastal gunnery fire.
 
Feb 2019
211
California
#6
I really dont know either way :( I have never heard of mortars ever being used against ships underway. I know the fall of shot for mortars in that era was horribly slow to the point defenders had time to get out of the way before the round hit them.
I believe some experimentation was done by the French (the Brits were briefly worried about it) who concluded the idea was impractical as hitting a moving ship would come down to sheer luck.
 
Feb 2016
4,225
Japan
#7
None that I know of. In 1810 British naval actions were mostly in the Med around Greece and Sicily or in the Indian Ocean hunting down French privateers who had been raiding E.Indian convoys.

In the Atlantic it was mainly blockade enforcement and little else.
 
Likes: Hanslune
Feb 2016
4,225
Japan
#8
British Naval actions... 1810.
14 September. Palamos, St Feliu and La Bisbal.
Captain Fane and HMS Cambrian and Spanish Frigate Flora support a Spanish raid on the above villages.

13 December 1810 - Palamos. HMS Cambrian, HMS Kent, HMS Ajax, HMS Sparrohawk and HMS minstrel land sailors and marines to destroy French supplies.

1810 August 27 Grand Port. Disasterous British attack on French squadron. Royal Navies worst day of the war. HMS Sirius -scuttled, HMS Iphegenia -captured, HmS Neriede - Captured, HMS Magicienne -scuttled, troopship Ranger-Captured.

22 March Santa Maura - HMS Leonidas lands Royal Marines and supports British capture of Greek island.

November 15 - Bei De la Seine, HMS Donegal, HMS Revenge, HMS Niobe and HMS Diana stop French attempt to run blockade. Amazone forced back to port, Elisa captured.

Action 18 September - Mauritius.
HMS Boudicca and HMS Ceylon capture French frigate Venus, Victor forced to retreat.

Action May 3 - Naples.
HMS Spartan is attacked by Neapolitan ships Cerere, Fama, Sparviero and Achilles, and 400 Swiss troops and 7 gunboats. Sparviero Captured, Fama and Cerere forced off heavily damadged.

April 28th - Battle of the Scaw. HMS Rose, a sloop, is attacked by a Danish sloop and a swarm of gunboats.


May 4th - Il de Re, French coast. HMS Daring, HMS Monkey, HMS Cadmus, HMS Armide launch boats to attack a French merchant convey sheltering there. 17 vessels are boarded but bad weather and wind means they can’t take them and had to burn 13 and beach 4. Shore batteries were involved here.

On 27 September, the boats of the 120-gun first rate HMS Caledonia, Captain Sir Harry Neale, the 74-gun Repulse-class third rate HMS Valiant, Captain Robert Dudley Oliver, and Armide, captured two laden brigs and burned a third that had taken shelter under the guns of a battery on the Point du Ché, near Angoulins. A force of 130 Royal Marines from the two ships of the line also took and destroyed the battery after engaging reinforcements on the way. The British suffered two men wounded, but killed at least 14 French soldiers in the battery alone.[11] The next day Armide, Caledonia, Valiant, Snapper, Arrow and the hired armed cutter Nimrod captured the San Nicolas and Aventura.
 
Likes: Hanslune