Naval powers at the start of WW2

Apr 2018
787
India
The Atlanta Class had 8 gun turrets, 16 x 5 inch.

Atlanta herself entered service a few days after Pearl Harbor, so would just miss out on the OP criteria. Again, this class saw heavy fighting at the Solomons.

Aah. Lovely boat. The welterweight ship with a middleweight's jab. James Hornfischer gave a rather poetic introduction of USS Atlanta.
 
Oct 2015
1,009
Virginia
Dramatic image of USS Savannah hit on turret 3 by a German FX1400 radio controlled bomb off Salerno 11 Sep 1943. (if it worked!?)
 

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Vaeltaja

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Sep 2012
3,700
Strange design that Atlanta (cruiser size ship but equipped with destroyer style manner) - then again it apparently was intended to act as a destroyer leader and given that it really is just a big destroyer (kinda like two destroyers combined) that kinda fits the bill. Then again if some one thought it was an actual cruiser and deployed it in such a manner...
 
Oct 2015
1,009
Virginia
Lightly armored Atlanta and Juneau were (out of necessity) engaged in Solomons surface action. Both were sunk on Friday Nov 13, 1942.
There was a rail-thin, soft-spoken guy on my paper route when I was a kid. Later I discovered he was one of the 10 survivors of the sinking of the USS Juneau.
 

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MG1962a

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Mar 2019
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Kansas
Strange design that Atlanta (cruiser size ship but equipped with destroyer style manner) - then again it apparently was intended to act as a destroyer leader and given that it really is just a big destroyer (kinda like two destroyers combined) that kinda fits the bill. Then again if some one thought it was an actual cruiser and deployed it in such a manner...
And really came into her own as an anti aircraft platform
 

Triceratops

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Dec 2011
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Aah. Lovely boat. The welterweight ship with a middleweight's jab. James Hornfischer gave a rather poetic introduction of USS Atlanta.
Neptune's Inferno, Hardtack.

MG brought up the firepower of a Brooklyn Class cruiser. From the same book:

"Firing semi-fixed ammunition that held the powder charge with the projectile in a single case, the Helena's fifteen guns were rated for ten rounds per minute, as against three or four for a heavy cruiser."

150 rounds per minute. Little wonder the Japanese though they were up against" machine gun" cruisers.
 
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pikeshot1600

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Jul 2009
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The last couple of pages in the thread have mentioned one aspect of pre-World War II naval powers that was only peripherally addressed in the 1922 Washington naval limitation treaty: Ships not to exceed 10,000 T with 8" guns.

While the limitation treaty did desist the ruinous capital ship arms race post WW I, it also in some respects created another race. The 1922 Treaty limited cruisers to 10,000 tons with gun armament no greater than 8". Each of the five treaty navies had its own particular interest in this ship type, and their own concept of its tactical usage.

1) The British preferred smaller cruisers because of the extent of the Empire and due to the cost of larger ships. The RN needed many cruisers to patrol and defend its many responsibilities.

2) France saw a larger cruiser as necessary for its far-flung imperial needs. France had overseas bases, but not to the degree of Britain's numerous industrial dockyards away from Great Britain.

3) Italy needed cruisers of sufficient size and number to both protect its communications in the Mediterranean (Libya; Dodecanese Is.) and to counter French cruiser development.

4) The Imperial Japanese Navy in 1922 (and at the end of the 1902 Anglo-Japanese Treaty 1923) was planning, and had been planning, for an eventual war in the western Pacific. Not only as a result of the agreed treaty limitations on Japan vis-a-vis Britain and the United States, but because of Japanese naval doctrine, the IJN favored as many large cruisers as they could afford, and with heavier armament than their probable enemies.

5) The United States, as the prime mover of the 1922 Washington Treaty, and due to domestic political factors, held back on naval construction for most of the 1920s, and fell behind in its primary theater of vital interest in the western Pacific, and behind its only probable enemy there. The 1922 treaty to limit capital ship construction began a different naval arms competition.

Japan began the race late in the year 1922.
 
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Triceratops

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Dec 2011
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Late Cretaceous
Marinho do Brasil 22 August 1942.

2 Battleships (1910) Mineas Gerais and Sao Paulo

2 Light Cruiser (1910), Bahia and Rio Grande do Sol

7 Destroyers, 6x Para Class (1910) + Maranhao (1913, surplus RN Acasta class, to Brazil 1920)

4 Submarines, 3x Tupi Class (1938), Tupi, Timbira and Tamoio
Humaita (1927)
Submarine Tender, Ceara (1915)

6 Minelayers, Carioca Class.

4 River gunboats.

Added during hostilities
6 Armed Trawlers, being built in Brazil for RN, Brazilian Navy from 24th August 1942.

3 Marcillo Dias Class Destroyers, Marcilo Dias, Greenhalg and Mariz Barros
8 Babitonga Class Destroyer Escorts (from US, standard DET type)
1 Benevente, built in Brazil.

16 Giona Class Sub-chasers (from US, standard PC type)
1 Rio Pardo, built in Brazil.
 
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